Grilled Scampi with Garlic / Kjempereker med Hvitløk

A shellfish recipe found in “Grillmat” (Grilled Food)
in the “Kjøkkenbiblioteket” (The Kitchen Library)
series published by Aventura Forlag in 1992

Grilled Scampi with Garlic / Kjempereker med Hvitløk

Scampi is raw when you buy them, yet like other shellfish, they
need just a short time on the grill.

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Crab Cakes with Wasabi Mayonnaise / Krabbekaker med Wasabimajones

A crab kake recipe inspired by Asian cuisines
found on  godt.no

Crab Cakes with Wasabi Mayonnaise / Krabbekaker med Wasabimajones

Replace the traditional fish cakes with succulent crab cakes and serve them with wasabi mayonnaise and a fresh green salad. Perfect everyday dinner – with an Asian twist!

Tip: If you want to make a little extra out of your meal, why not make homemade mayonnaise.

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In Context

Wasabi (ワサビ or わさび(山葵), earlier 和佐比; Eutrema japonicum or Wasabia japonica) is a plant of the Brassicaceae family, which includes cabbages, horseradish, and mustard. It is also called Japanese horseradish, although horseradish is a different plant (which is generally used as a substitute for wasabi, due to the scarcity of the wasabi plant). Its stem is used as a condiment and has an extremely strong pungency more akin to hot mustard than the capsaicin in a chili pepper, producing vapours that stimulate the nasal passages more than the tongue. The plant grows naturally along stream beds in mountain river valleys in Japan. The two main cultivars in the marketplace are E. japonicum ‘Daruma’ and ‘Mazuma’, but there are many others. The origin of wasabi cuisine has been clarified from the oldest historical records; it takes its rise in Nara prefecture, and more recently has seen a surge in popularity from the early 1990s to mid 2000s.

Islander Treat Salad / Karibisk Salattraktering

A salad recipe found in “Swappin’ Good Recipes Feat. Cottage Cheese” published by American Dairy Association in 1970Islander Treat Salad / Karibisk Salattraktering

Unless you were stinking rich I guess this was a salad you might have served rather seldom. Four servings of salad made from 8 freshly cooked lobster tail served with fresh pineapple was not cheap ingredients back in 1970, neither are they today.
But man, it looks absolutely delicious.

Ted
Winking smile

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Shrimp Curry / Rekekarri

A dinner recipe found in “Cooking for a Man”
published by House of Heublein in 1953
Shrimp Curry / Rekekarri

Since it is my birthday today I thought it only right to post one of my
favourite dishes. I love curry and I love shellfish. And I even found
that recipe in a book that was published the year I was born. So now
those of you with a head for numbers can find out how old I am

Ted
Winking smile

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Crabmeat Salad / Krabbesalat

A salad recipe found in “Old Gloucester Sea Food Recipes”
published by  Frank E Davis Fish Company in 1932

Crabmeat Salad / Krabbesalat

Frank E Davis Fish Company published a whole series of cookbooks like this one in the first half of the 1930s. They featured recipes for both for canned and fresh fish and shellfish. All were richly illustrated in full colour – Ted

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Cozze Gratinate – Gratinated Mussels / Gratinerte Blåskjell

An appatizer recipe found in “Ganske Enkelt – Italienske
Oppskrifter” (Quite Simple – Italian Recipes) published by Notabene Forlag in 1995

Cozze Gratinate – Gratinated Mussels / Gratinerte Blåskjell

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Crab Soup / Krabbesuppe

A luxurious soup recipe found in “Sunt og Godt”
(Healthy and Nice) published by Det Beste in 1988
Crab Soup / Krabbesuppe

This luxury soup is made with a minimal of effort and it is a pleasure to serve. The mild crab flavour gets a warmer undertone from the curry and basil. You can use lobster instead of crab if you want an even more exclusive soup.

It may be more exclusive, but it will not be more tasty, as lobster boiled in the traditional manner taste less than crabs
cooked the same way

Ted
Winking smile

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Fish and Shellfish Skewers / Fisk og Skalldyrspidd

A tempting barbecue recipe found in “God Mat fra Sjøen”
(Nice Food from the Sea) published by Gyldendal in 1984

Fish and Shellfish Skewers / Fisk og Skalldyrspidd

When Easter is over, it’s time to get the barbecue out of the shed. And why not skip the hamburger and hot dogs for once and cook some juicy seafood skewers instead.

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Hungry History: Lobsters

Hungry History: Lobsters

Ian Knauer at history.com dives into lowbrow history of a pricey food as he assembles two versions of a delicious lobster roll.

You wouldn’t suspect, perhaps, that a close relative of grasshoppers and tarantulas could be widely considered an elegant Hungry History: Lobstersindulgence in the United States or any other nation of generally sophisticated palates.

And yet, every time a chef proudly presents a lobster-based creation as a signature dish, that’s exactly what’s going on. Prepared broiled in butter or scampi, Newburg or in bisque, the lobster—a member of the invertebrate phylum Arthropoda just like insects and spiders—has held a place of honor at countless festive feasts and romantic repasts for well over a century. Nonetheless, trappers have a prosaic nickname for lobsters: bugs.

Lobster’s appeal as a special delicacy wasn’t always so, but not because Americans were necessarily repulsed by lobster’s less appetizing cousins. Rather, back in the colonial era, the clawed crustacean was so abundant that it was hardly deemed exceptional.

Hungry History: LobstersA three-term governor of Plymouth Colony who came over on the Mayflower, Edward Winslow, for instance, wrote to an English friend in 1621 that “Our Bay is full of Lobsters all the Summer.” At the end of that decade, Francis Higginson of Salem, Massachusetts, wrote in his book “New England’s Plantation, or a short and true description of the Commodities of that Country” that the “abundance of sea-fish are almost beyond believing … We take an abundance of lobsters, and the least boy in the Plantation may both catch and eat what he will of them. For my own part, I was soon cloyed with them, they were so great, and fat, and luscious.”

Hungry History: Lobsters

Travel ahead one century and several hundred miles northeast to Nova Scotia, and the situation was similar. In his 1876 book “The Emigrant and Sportsman in Canada: Some Experiences of An Old Country Settler,” essayist John J. Rowan recounted that “on still summer nights, lobster spearing parties are the fashion among Halifax people … On one occasion, I saw several acres of potato ground manured Hungry History: Lobsterswith them … Lobster shells about a house are looked upon as signs of poverty and degradation.”

Yet despite Rowan’s observations, times were in fact changing, and the transformation of Homarus americanus (American, or Maine, lobster) from fertilizer to fanciful indulgence had already begun in the United States by the mid-19th century.

The secret ingredient to lobster becoming a luxury was coal. Not on a barbecue, but as the fuel that powered steam-engine locomotives, explained culinary historian and consultant Lou Greenstein of North Reading, Massachusetts. “As the Industrial Revolution got underway and railroads were built, the capacity existed for perishable foods like lobster to be packed in ice and transported from the point of origin to inland places like Chicago,” said Greenstein, author of “A la Carte: A Tour of Dining History.” Hungry History: LobstersThe perceived romance of the travel story involved—not to mention the very real expense—added to the cachet of regionally “exotic” foods.

What’s more, the fact that eating multi-jointed lobster presented intrinsic logistical difficulties made it even more desirable to some. In the Victorian era, “labor was inexpensive,” explained Greenstein. “So a lot of the dishes served from the 1850s on featured lobster that had already been picked, like molded lobster salad. This way, servants did the work, and Victorian ladies didn’t have to go through the ordeal of eating something difficult in public. Even lobster Newburg—it can be served in the shell, but it was already picked.”

Hungry History: LobstersYet if, on the one claw, lobster has maintained its overall reputation as a luxury food, it has, on the other, spawned a very particular kind of informal dining experience in coastal New England: the lobster shack.

Mike Urban, a Connecticut resident and author of the book “Lobster Shacks: A Road Guide to New England’s Best Lobster Joints,” said that the first lobster shack most likely emerged in the early 1900s in Maine. “The first ones were offshoots of a lobsterman’s business,” he hypothesized. “His wife or kids might have begun cooking some of the catch right on the dock, for locals. They started small.”

Hungry History: LobstersOne of the earliest lobster shacks whose history Urban can document is Bayley’s Lobster Pound in Scarborough, Maine. Based in a small commercial shack he bought, Steve Bayley lobstered to supplement the income he earned at a clam-packing plant, where he worked beginning in 1916. Sometimes, after he’d supplied lobsters to all his nearby restaurant and market clients, “he would pack overcatch in suitcases, jump on a Portland-bound train and sell it at a local market there,” said Urban. From there, it became a small logical leap to prepare and sell simple boiled lobsters and lobster rolls (possibly a Bayley invention, too) right at the shack, cutting out middlemen. Today, the third and fourth generations of Bayley family members run the seasonal business. And in the century since Bayley’s began, shacks have come to densely dot the New England coast.

Hungry History: Lobsters

A drive or train ride away, New York’s Delmonico’s—in business, on and off, since 1827, but currently thriving on Beaver Street in a Victorian-era building—is also central to the lobster cuisine story. It was one of the first fine restaurants to serve lobster, according to Greenstein. Even more significant, a new way of preparing lobster—with butter, cream, Madeira and eggs—was introduced to one of the original Delmonico brothers by world-traveling sea captain Ben Wenberg in 1876. Lobster à la Wenberg became a favorite of patrons, but when Wenberg and Delmonico had a falling-out, the new specialty fell off the menu, too. When requests for the dish could no longer be ignored, though, it returned—with the letter-shifted name of Lobster à la Newberg (or Newburg, as it’s now spelled).

If the Puritans could see the esteem in which lobster is held today, they would doubtless be shell-shocked. But with melted butter easing its ascent, Homarus americanus clawed its way to the top, and it looks like it’s here to stay.

Nordic Dip / Nordisk Dipp

A flashback from the seventies found on “European Favourites” published by Collins in 1973
Nordic Dip / Nordisk Dipp

This may very well be a Nordic kind of dip from the early seventies. Paprika was high fashion among the cooking savoir faire back then and you risked getting celery in dishes where they far from belonged. Probably because some local health guru had sworn to its many benefits.

I can even remember a tv ad proclaiming celery’s magnificence as snacks. With this dip you could actually end up dipping pieces of celery in a dip containing celery. I’ve said it before, those were hard times back then.

To make it even worse, the horrid disco music  was lurking in the near future. A few years later you could actually risk sitting somewhere overdosing on celery listening to that horrible music. – Ted

Winking smile
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Dublin Bay Prawn Bisque / Dublin Bay Kremet Rekesuppe

An updated Irish classic recipe found on delish.com
Dublin Bay Prawn Bisque_post

Creamy and spicy, this update on the classic Irish soup will impress any foodie and is hearty enough to be a meal in itself.

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Iceland Scallops with White Wine Sauce / Haneskjell med Hvitvinssaus

A shelfish starter found in “God Mat Fra Sjøen” (Great Food
From The Sea) Published by Gyldendal in 1984
haneskjell i hvitvinsaus_post

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Iceland scallops are known for their iconic shape, a fan-like shell with fluted grooves. Unlike its giant sea scallop cousin which can propel itself by expelling jets of water, the Iceland scallop attaches itself to rocks on the seafloor in shallow waters. They are plentiful in sub-Iceland scalloparctic waters off Newfoundland, Labrador and Quebec in Canada, Iceland, Greenland, Norway, and in the Barents Sea off Russia.

This bi-valve mollusk has a reddish-pink upper shell and white or cream-coloured lower shell. Ten-year-old scallops measure between 6.5 and 8.5 cm in height with the largest measuring 16 cm. The scallop is revered for its sweet, delicious flavour and melt-in-the-mouth texture.

Iceland scallops are known for their iconic shape, a fan-like shell with fluted grooves. Unlike its giant sea scallop cousin which can propel itself by expelling jets of water, the Iceland scallop attaches itself to rocks on the seafloor in shallow waters. They are plentiful in sub-arctic waters off Newfoundland, Labrador and Quebec in Canada, Iceland, Greenland, Norway, and in the Barents Sea off Russia.

Iceland scallop2

This bi-valve mollusk has a reddish-pink upper shell and white or cream-coloured lower shell. Ten-year-old scallops measure between 6.5 and 8.5 cm in height with the largest measuring 16 cm. The scallop is revered for its sweet, delicious flavour and melt-in-the-mouth texture.

Deep Fried Shellfish with Greek Sauce / Frityrstekte Skalldyr med Gresk Saus

A delicious starter/snack recipe found in “Forretter” (Starters)
published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1982

frityrstekte skalldyr med gresk saus_post

Deep fried mussels, shrimp, crayfish and other types of shelfish are suitable as a starter or snacks. A mixture of various shellfish and boiled fish cut into pieces, offers many delicious possibilities.

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Curry Mussels / Blåskjell i Karri

A hot shelfish recipe found in “Carl Butlers Kokebok – Fortsettelsen” (Carl Butler’s Cook Book – The Continuance)
published in 1991

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Nordic cookbook history was written in 1974. That year a bunch of foodie friends published a cookbook that would become one of Scandinavia’s most popular, Carl Butler’s Cookbook. With folded corners, patches of pie dough, tomato and French mustard and an unmistakable scent of herbal spices and garlic it can be found in hundreds of thousands of Swedish, Finnish, Danish and Norwegian homes. The book put for the first time coq au vin, moussaka and paté on our tables.

For all Scandinavians who like me love this cook book it took 17 years before we could hurry to the book shops to buy the continuance. It was simply called “Carl Butlers Kokebok – Fortsettelsen” (Carl Butler’s Cook Book – The Continuance). This recipe is from that book – Ted

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Serviche of Scallop with Herbs / Serviche av Kamskjell med Urter

A starter recipe found in “Alt Om Urter” (All About Herbs)
published by Ekstrabokklubben in 1985

serviche av kammuslinger med urter_post

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Scallop (/ˈskɒləp/ or /ˈskæləp/) is a common name that is primarily applied to any one of numerous species of saltwater clams or marine bivalve mollusks in the taxonomic family Pectinidae, the scallops. However, the common name “scallop” is also sometimes applied to species in other closely related families within the superfamily Pectinoidea.

ill_01Scallops are a cosmopolitan family of bivalves, found in all of the world’s oceans, though never in freshwater. They are one of very few groups of bivalves to be primarily “free-living”; many species are capable of rapidly swimming short distances and even of migrating some distance across the ocean floor. A small minority of scallop species live cemented to rocky substrates as adults, while others are more simply attached by means of a filament they secrete called a byssal thread. The majority of species, however, live recumbent on sandy substrates, and when they sense the presence of a predator such as a starfish, they are able to escape by swimming swiftly but erratically through the water using a form of jet propulsion created by repeatedly clapping their shells together. Scallops have a well-developed nervous system, and unlike most other bivalves they have numerous simple eyes situated around the edge of their mantles.

ill_02

Many species of scallops are highly prized as a food source, and some are farmed as aquaculture. The word “scallop” is also applied to the meat of these bivalves when it is sold as seafood. In addition the name “scallop” is used as part of the name of dishes based on the meat of scallops, and is even applied to some dishes not containing scallop at all but which are prepared in a similar fashion. The brightly colored, symmetrical, fan-shaped shells of scallops with their radiating and often fluted sculpture are valued by shell collectors, and have been used since ancient times as motifs in art, architecture and design.

Scallops do produce pearls, though the pearls do not have the buildup of layers, or “nacre”, and may not have luster or iridescence. They can be dull, small and of varying color, but there are exceptions that are appreciated for their aesthetic qualities.

Text from Wikipedia