Welsh Cawl / Walisisk Cawl

A recipe for the Welch national dish Cawl found at
was then called
about.com
Welsh Cawl / Walisisk Cawl

Cawl is the national dish of Wales. Welsh Cawl is a stew and made from bacon, Welsh lamb or beef, cabbage and leeks. Though more traditionally cheaper cuts of lamb are used, be warned Welsh recipes for Cawl vary from region to region and sometimes even season to season.There is no hard and fast rule.

Cawl can be eaten in one bowl, though often the broth will be served first followed by the meat and vegetables.

The flavors in Welsh Cawl do improve by keeping for a day or two, so don’t be afraid to make it in advance or save any leftovers for reheating.

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West African Meat and Spinach Stew / Vestafrikanske Kjøtt- og Spinatstuing

An African recipe found in “The Best of International Cooking”
published by Hamlyn in 1984

West African Meat and Spinach Stew / Vestafrikanske Kjøtt- og Spinatstuing

West African cuisine encompasses a diverse range of foods that are split between its 16 countries. In West Africa, many families grow and raise their own food, and within each there is a division of labor. Indigenous foods consist of a number of plant species and animals, and are important to those whose lifestyle depends on farming and hunting.

The history of West Africa also plays a large role in their cuisine and recipes, as interactions with different cultures (particularly the Arab world and later Europeans) over the centuries have introduced many ingredients that would go on to become key components of the various national cuisines today.

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Mushroom Stew on Butterfried Toast / Soppstuing på Smørstekt Toast

A delicious snack recipe found in “Lær Mer om Sopp” (Learn More
About Mushrooms ) published by BAMA gruppen in 1982

Mushroom Stew on Butterfried Toast / Soppstuing på Smørstekt Toast

Edible mushrooms are the fleshy and edible fruit bodies of several species of macrofungi (fungi which bear fruiting structures that are large enough to be seen with the naked eye). They can appear either below ground (hypogeous) or above ground (epigeous) where they may be picked by hand. Edibility may be defined by criteria that include absence of poisonous effects on humans and desirable taste and aroma.

Edible mushrooms are consumed for their nutritional value and they are occasionally consumed for their supposed medicinal value. Mushrooms consumed by those practicing folk medicine are known as medicinal mushrooms. While hallucinogenic mushrooms (e.g. psilocybin mushrooms) are occasionally consumed for recreational or religious purposes, they can produce severe nausea and disorientation, and are therefore not commonly considered edible mushrooms.

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Mushrooms in Tart Shells / Sopp i Terteskjell

A lunch recipe found in “Alt om Urter” (All About Herbs) published by Den Norske Bokklubben in 1885sopp i terteskjell_post_thumb[2]_thumb

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Bidos – Sami Party Food / Bidos – Samisk Festmat

A traditional Sami reindeer stew found on matprat.no274_bidos_post

Bidos is the Sami People’s traditional party food. There are many different recipes for bidos and it can be made both with and without thickening. This is an authentic recipe – devoid of affectation, but full of flavour. Leage Buorre!

000_recipe_eng_flagg Recipe in English  000_recipe_nor_flagg Oppskrift på norsk

Recipe posted at:
Tickle My Tastebuds Tuesday[4]TuesdaysTable copyTreasure Box Tuesday[4]