Pea Soup from Western Norway / Ertesuppe fra Stryn

A traditional Norwegian soup recipe found on matoppskrift.no
Pea Soup from Western Norway / Ertesuppe fra Stryn

This pea soup that originates from Stryn was widely served during harvesting and threshing back in the old days. All vegetables that was available was generally used, as well as the meat or flesh that could be used. The beef, mutton or pork was usually smoked, dried or salted. It was standard to serve the soup with flatbread and always with boiled potatoes. The flatbread was usually dipped in the broth during the meal.

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Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

A classic soup recipe from “Sunt og Godt”
(Wholesome and Nice) published by Det Beste in 1988

Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

Mulligatawny soup is an English soup with origins in the Indian cuisine. The name originates from the Tamil words millagai / milagu and thanni  and can be translated as “pepper-water”.

The recipe for mulligatawny has varied greatly over the years and there is no single original version. Later versions included British modifications that included meat but the local Madras recipe on which it was based most definitely did not. Early references to it in English go back to 1784. In 1827, William Kitchiner, wrote that it had become fashionable in Britain.

By the mid 1800s, “Wyvern”, the pen-name of Arthur Robert Kenney Herbert (1840-1916), wrote in his popular “Culinary Jottings” that “really well-made mulligatunny is a thing of the past.”

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Hernekeitto – Finnish Pea Soup / Finsk Ertesuppe

A classic Finnish soup recipe found in “Kullinarisk Pass”
(Culinary Passport) published by Tupperware in 1970

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All the Nordic countries have their own version of pea soup as do most countries in the world I guess. This is the Finnish take on the soup – Ted

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British Onion Soup with Red Leicester Toast / British Løksuppe med Rød Leicester Toast

A classic British soup recipe found on goodhousekeeping.co.uk
British Onion Soup with Red Leicester Toast / British Løksuppe med Rød Leicester Toast

Mouth-watering Red Leicester toasts are the perfect accompaniment to this fabulous British onion soup.

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Mussel Brose / Blåskjellsuppe

A classic Scotish mussel soup recipe found in
“The Cooking of The British Isles” published in 1970

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Mussel Brose or Mussel Broth is a regional dish of Scotland. The word ‘Brose’ was used to mean a thick broth or old-fashioned potage. In Scotland the most common thickener was oatmeal. 

Scotland has very famous mussel beds, producing some of the finest mussels in the world, and if you can source fresh mussels from Scotland they will be wonderful in this broth.

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Wild Garlic Soup / Ramsløksuppe

A traditional Norwegian recipe found on bygdekvinnelaget.no411_Ramsløksuppe_post

Wild garlic (Allium ursinum) is a plant used in cooking. The leaves can be used in salads and as a seasoning in soups and stewed spinach.

Wild garlic is an up to 50 cm/20 in tall plant that smells of garlic and spread out like a white blanket over the forest floor. It is a spring plant and fills the woods with an intense smell of garlic. The onion belonging to each stalk usually has only two leaves and both continue upward in herbal leaf discs. The Wild garlic leaves are much thinner and deeper green than for other types of onion.

Wild garlic growing in Norway in shady fir- and broadleaf forests. Available in the lowlands along the coast from Østfold to Trøndelag.

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