Cock-a-Leekie Soup / Kyllingsuppe med Purre

A classic soup recipe found in “Kulinarisk Pass”
(Culinary Passport) published by Tupper Ware in 1970

Cock-a-Leekie Soup / Kyllingsuppe med Purre

While it is called “Scotland’s National Soup,” it probably originated as a chicken and onion soup in France. By the 16th century, it had made its way to Scotland, where the onions were replaced with leeks. The first recipe was printed in 1598, though the name “cock-a-leekie” did not come into use until the 18th century.

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Salmon Chowder / Laksesuppe

A dinner recipe found in “How To Eat Canned Salmon”
published by Alaska Packers Association in 1900

Salmon Chowder / Laksesuppe

Fresh salmon is so cheap and plentyful in our shops here in Norway that eating canned ones seems strange to us. But a quick check showed that the net is crammed full of recipes for canned salmon so it obviously doesn’t seem that strange elsewhere. Besides, transporting fresh fish over larger distances back in 1900 was close to impossible so back then eating canned salmon probably seemed more sensible –Ted

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Oriental Turkey Soup / Orientalsk Kalkunsuppe

An Asian inspired soup recipe found on
“The Quick & Eary  Armour Cookbook” published by 
the Benjamin Company in 1980

Oriental Turkey Soup / Orientalsk Kalkunsuppe

I can’t help spotting gherkins on the picture even though it is not mentioned in the recipe so the choice is yours, trust the picture or the recipe. In my opinion you can never go wrong with gherkins, I simply love the stuff

Ted
Winking smile

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Split Pea & Ham Soup / Gul Ertesuppe med Skinke

A recipe for a warming, filling soup found on oxo.co.ukSplit Pea & Ham Soup / Gul Ertesuppe med SkinkeSplit Pea & Ham Soup / Gul Ertesuppe med Skinke

This recipe is English, but it might just as well have been Norwegian. I’ve eaten many a bowl of soup like this in my childhood and I stil make it ever so often. You might safely say it is one of my favourite soups – Ted

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Chickens Soup with Dumplings / Hønsesuppe med Melboller

A traditional Norwegian soup recipe found on matprat.no
Chickens Soup with Dumplings / Hønsesuppe med Melboller

Traditionally soups like this were made with hens, not chicken. Clear soup like this is lean food, still  filling and satisfying. In addition, it is very reasonably priced food. Just remember that hen meat need a relatively long cooking time.

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Spicy Bacon and Potato Soup / Krydret Bacon- og Potetsupp

A hot in both meaning of the word soup recipe
found on
allers.no
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Nothing is better than a hot soup with spicy flavours on
cold winter days!

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Curried Butternut Squash and Pear Soup / Karrikrydret Butternut Gresskar- og Pære Suppe

A delicious soup recipe found in “50+ Quick & Easy Recipes”
Published by Gotham Steel

Curried Butternut Squash and Pear Soup / Karrikrydret Butternut Gresskar- og Pære Suppe

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Butternut squash (Cucurbita moschata), sometimes known in Australia and New Zealand as butternut pumpkin or gramma, is a type of winter squash that grows on a vine. It has butternut-squash (1)a sweet, nutty taste similar to that of a pumpkin. It has tan-yellow skin and orange fleshy pulp with a compartment of seeds in the bottom. When ripe, it turns increasingly deep orange, and becomes sweeter and richer. It is a good source of fiber, vitamin C, manganese, magnesium, and potassium; and it is an excellent source of vitamin A and vitamin E.

Although technically a fruit, butternut squash is used as a vegetable that can be roasted, sautéed, toasted, puréed for soups, or mashed and used in casseroles, breads, and muffins.

History

The most popular variety, the Waltham Butternut, originated in Waltham, Massachusetts, where it was developed at the Waltham Experiment Station by Robert E. Young. Dorothy Leggett claims that the Waltham Butternut squash was developed during the 1940s by her late husband, Charles Leggett, in Stow, Massachusetts, and then subsequently introduced by him to the researchers at the Waltham Field Station. She also claimed that name came from “smooth as butter, sweet as nut”.

Cambodian Chicken-and-Rice Soup with Shrimp / Kambodsjansk Kylling-og-Ris Suppe med Reker

A spicy Asian soupe recipe found on foodandwine.com
Cambodian Chicken-and-Rice Soup with Shrimp_food&wine_post

The chef’s way: For this spicy, soothing and restorative chicken-and-rice soup, Ratha Chau prepares his own delectable chicken stock and roasts a chicken, which is then cut into large pieces and added to it.

The easy way: Using prepared stock and preroasted chicken significantly cuts back on prep time.

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Vegetable Pottage / Grønnsakssuppe

A everyday soup recipe for ordinary people
found on
cookit.e2bn.org
Medieval MondayVegetable Pottage_post

People have eaten a lot of soup throughout the ages, ever since they had made the first cooking pots that would withstand heat. In Tudor times, it was still the main part of an ordinary person’s diet. It was basically a vegetable soup, flavoured with herbs and thickened with oats. 

Ordinary people would not have been able to afford much meat, so they would rely on this soup as their staple diet together with bread and cheese. Occasionally meat bones or fish would be added when available.

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Meat Soup with Oatmeal / Kjøttsuppe med Havregryn

A delicious hearty meat soup recipe found on matprat.no
the soup councilMeat Soup with Oatmeal / Kjøttsuppe med Havregryn

A delicious, hearty soup with game meat or beef for cold autumn and winter evenings. The soup can advantageously be made a day in advance so the flavors can develop.

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Pea Soup from Western Norway / Ertesuppe fra Stryn

A traditional Norwegian soup recipe found on matoppskrift.no
Pea Soup from Western Norway / Ertesuppe fra Stryn

This pea soup that originates from Stryn was widely served during harvesting and threshing back in the old days. All vegetables that was available was generally used, as well as the meat or flesh that could be used. The beef, mutton or pork was usually smoked, dried or salted. It was standard to serve the soup with flatbread and always with boiled potatoes. The flatbread was usually dipped in the broth during the meal.

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Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

A classic soup recipe from “Sunt og Godt”
(Wholesome and Nice) published by Det Beste in 1988

Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

Mulligatawny soup is an English soup with origins in the Indian cuisine. The name originates from the Tamil words millagai / milagu and thanni  and can be translated as “pepper-water”.

The recipe for mulligatawny has varied greatly over the years and there is no single original version. Later versions included British modifications that included meat but the local Madras recipe on which it was based most definitely did not. Early references to it in English go back to 1784. In 1827, William Kitchiner, wrote that it had become fashionable in Britain.

By the mid 1800s, “Wyvern”, the pen-name of Arthur Robert Kenney Herbert (1840-1916), wrote in his popular “Culinary Jottings” that “really well-made mulligatunny is a thing of the past.”

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Hernekeitto – Finnish Pea Soup / Finsk Ertesuppe

A classic Finnish soup recipe found in “Kullinarisk Pass”
(Culinary Passport) published by Tupperware in 1970

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All the Nordic countries have their own version of pea soup as do most countries in the world I guess. This is the Finnish take on the soup – Ted

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British Onion Soup with Red Leicester Toast / British Løksuppe med Rød Leicester Toast

A classic British soup recipe found on goodhousekeeping.co.uk
British Onion Soup with Red Leicester Toast / British Løksuppe med Rød Leicester Toast

Mouth-watering Red Leicester toasts are the perfect accompaniment to this fabulous British onion soup.

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Mussel Brose / Blåskjellsuppe

A classic Scotish mussel soup recipe found in
“The Cooking of The British Isles” published in 1970

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Mussel Brose or Mussel Broth is a regional dish of Scotland. The word ‘Brose’ was used to mean a thick broth or old-fashioned potage. In Scotland the most common thickener was oatmeal. 

Scotland has very famous mussel beds, producing some of the finest mussels in the world, and if you can source fresh mussels from Scotland they will be wonderful in this broth.

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