Herb Mayonnaise / Urtemajones

A recipe found in“Alt Om Urter” (All About Herbs)
published by Den Norske Bokklubben in 1985

Herb Mayonnaise / Urtemajones

This green mayonnaise is the best accessory for cold salmon or trout, hard boiled egg or cold fish in aspic.

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Smoked Salmon with Creamy Herb Pesto / Røkt Laks med Kremet Urtepesto

A delicious bufet recipe found on kiwi.no
Smoked Salmon with Creamy Herb Pesto / Røkt Laks med Kremet Urtepesto

This delicacy will quickly becomes a favorite on the buffet table.
If you don’t eat it all, don’t worry. it’s almost better the next day!

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One-Pan English Breakfast / Pannestekt Engelsk Frokost

A quick breakfast recipe found on BBCgoodfood
One-Pan English Breakfast / Pannestekt Engelsk Frokost

This combines all the best ingredients of a traditional English breakfast in one frying pan, with no need to chop anything.

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History and Facts About Mint

Fresh mint is available all year-round today, but it is most abundant in the warm summer months. Make the most of this versatile herb’s cooling and refreshing properties.

mint_01Mint is as tasty as it is healthy. Its essential oil is widely used in manufactured products such as toothpaste, shower gel and medicines for its naturally antibacterial and cooling qualities. In cooking, mint sprigs can be added to cooking water or the chopped leaves incorporated into a dish to make the most of this herb’s aromatic, flavoursome and digestive abilities.

Originally taken as a medicinal herb to treat stomach ache and chest pains, it is to this day the most called upon herb for soothing a great deal of ailments from indigestion to heartburn and the common cold to bad breath. That’s not all; mint can also provide a cooling sensation to the skin helping to treat minor burns and skin irritations due to its anti-inflammatory properties and it can ease and unblock the breathing and respiratory passages as well as relieve headaches; cup of mint tea anyone?

mint_03Mint is known to have originated in Asia and the Mediterranean region, mint has been known for its many benefits throughout history. Greeks used to clean their banqueting tables with the herb and added it to their baths to stimulate their bodies, whilst Romans used it in sauces, as an aid to digestion and as a mouth freshener. Medieval monks drew on the herb for its culinary and medicinal properties. In many cultures, mint symbolised hospitality and was offered as a sign of welcome and friendship to guests.

mint_05Mint derives its name from the ancient Greek mythical character Minthe. According to Greek myth, Minthe was a river nymph. Hades, the God of the Underworld, fell in love with Minthe and when Persephone, Hades’s wife, found out, she turned Minthe into a plant, so that everyone would walk all over her and crush her. Unable to undo the spell, Hades gave Minthe a magnificent aroma so that he could smell her and be near her when people trod on her.

mint_06Leaving this mythical world, we know that mint gets its tell tale enticing aroma from menthol, an essential oil present in its leaves. Mint contains a number of vitamins and minerals which are vital to maintain good health. Rich in Vitamins A and C it also contains smaller amounts of Vitamin B2 and minerals including calcium, zinc, copper and magnesium. And even though mint is mostly consumed in small quantities, the vital nutrients obtained are still beneficial and shouldn’t be underestimated.

Text from topfoodfacts.com

How to Make ‘Sun-Dried’ Tomatoes…in the Oven! / Hvordan Lage ‘Soltørkede’ Tomater… i Ovnen!

A great ’how to’ recipe found on about.com/food/How to Make 'Sun-Dried' Tomatoes...in the Oven!_italianfood.about_post

Drying is a traditional Italian way to preserve an abundance of ripe summer tomatoes so that they can be enjoyed throughout the rest of the year, particularly in the southern Italian regions of Calabria and Puglia.

The store-bought sun-dried tomatoes I had tasted were a bit leathery and tough, with not much flavor. They seemed like a faded, desiccated memory of a tomato, rather than a fragrant, intensified taste of summer days. Homemade sun-dried tomatoes are another thing entirely: fragrant and chewy but not tough, with complex, concentrated tomato flavor and a slight sweetness.

Although it’s not difficult, the trouble with making them at home is that many of us do not have the abundant outdoor space required, or the time, or perhaps we lack consistent, strong sunshine, or live in highly polluted cities or bug-infested areas where perhaps drying food outdoors is not the best idea.

The solution? You can easily dry them in your oven.

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Dill History

To most Americans, dill weed is invariably paired with pickles. It is no wonder since Americans alone consume more than nine pounds of pickles per person each year. In Europe and Asia, dill has long been a staple herb. Where would seafood be without the crisp flavor of dill?

History

000_dill_01Botanically known as Anethum graveolens, dill weed is a member of the parsley family. It is native to the eastern Mediterranean region and western Asia. The word dill comes from the old Norse word dylla, meaning to soothe or lull. It dates back in writing to about 3000 B.C., where it was mentioned in Egyptian medical texts.

The leaves, flowers, and oval flat seeds of the dill plant are all edible. The plant has thin, feathery green leaves, of which only about the top eight inches are used.

It is very easy to grow at home in the garden or in containers. (If you grow your own, be aware that the mature seeds are toxic to birds.)

Dill weed has a flavor likened to mild caraway or fennel leaves. The plant is, in fact, often mistaken for the feathery fronds of fennel.

Fresh and dried dill leaves (sometimes called “dill weed” to distinguish it from dill seed) are widely used as herbs in Europe and central Asia.

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Like caraway, the fernlike leaves of dill are aromatic and are used to flavor many foods such as gravlax (cured salmon) and other fish dishes, borscht and other soups, as well as pickles (where the dill flower is sometimes used). Dill is best when used fresh as it loses its flavor rapidly if dried; however, freeze-dried dill leaves retain their flavor relatively well for a few months.

Dill seed, having a flavor similar to caraway but also resembling that of fresh or dried dill weed, is used as a spice. Dill oil is extracted from the leaves, stems and seeds of the plant. The oil from the seeds is distilled and used in the manufacturing of soaps.

Dill is the eponymous ingredient in dill pickles: cucumbers preserved in salty brine and/or vinegar.