Soda & Softdrink Saturday – Patio Diet Cola

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Patio Diet Cola was a brand of diet soda introduced by Pepsi in 1963. It was created in response to Diet Rite Cola. Fitness promoter Debbie Drake was Patio Diet Cola’s spokesperson; the drink was also marketed as a soda alternative for diabetics.

patio diet cola_02In 1964, Patio released orange, grape, and root beer flavors. This flavor line was not meant to compete with brands like Orange Crush, but rather fill out the line. Patio sodas were available in the cold-bottle market: grocery and mom-and-pop stores. Advertising for Patio was comparatively scarce; at the time, bottlers were regionally franchised, and related advertising was necessarily local.

In 1964, Patio diet cola became Diet Pepsi. The newly branded diet soda was advertised alongside Pepsi, with the tagline “Pepsi either way”, which replaced the slogan “Dances with flavor”. Most of the remaining Patio line of flavors were phased out by the early 1970s, while a few survived until the mid 1970s.

In popular culture

The creation of an advertising campaign for Patio was a featured plot of the third season of the AMC television series Mad Men. In “My Old Kentucky Home”, the advertising agency hired an Ann-Margret look-alike. In “The Arrangements”, they notably used a take-off of Ann-Margret’s opening number from the film Bye Bye Birdie for their television commercial.

How Patio cola changed the world of fizzy drinks

patio diet cola_04Fifty years ago Diet Pepsi was first marketed, trying to fix a link in consumers’ minds between sugar-free fizzy drinks and weight loss. But today, the very term “diet” on food and drink almost seems a little retro.

The product featured in the first few episodes of series three of the advertising agency drama, and is a point of dispute between Sterling Cooper staff members when PepsiCo reject a television commercial based on the film Bye Bye Birdie.

Patio was a real product and the year after its introduction in 1963 it was rebranded as Diet Pepsi. But Pepsi’s move into diet drinks was inspired by an unusual source.

A soft drink produced for diabetic patients at New York’s Jewish Sanitarium for Chronic Disease in the early 1950s called No-Cal ballooned in popularity, far beyond the customer base its maker expected. It turned out more than half the people buying No-Cal weren’t diabetic – they were just watching their weight.

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This caught the attention of Royal Crown, a cola maker, which introduced Diet Rite Cola in 1962. Their product was marketed towards the calorie-conscious as a dietetic product. The strategy worked – in three years, sales of diet drinks increased fivefold. Pepsi was forced to act.

patio diet cola_05But PepsiCo was not sure there was a big enough market for their diet drink, or that it would be successful. So they hedged their bets. They released the drink, but avoided connecting it to their main Pepsi brand, worried a potential failure could tarnish the brand they had spent years building. When they recognised the fad for diet food and drink wasn’t disappearing, they renamed Patio.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Malta

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Malta (also called young beer, children’s beer, or wheat soda) is a type of soft drink. It is a carbonated malt beverage, meaning it is brewed from barley, hops, and water much like beer; corn and caramel colour may also be added. However, Malta is non-alcoholic, and is consumed in the same way as soda or cola in its original carbonated form, and to some extent, iced tea in non-carbonated form.

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In other words, Malta is actually a beer that has not been fermented. It is similar in colour to stout (dark brown) but is very sweet, generally described as tasting like molasses. Unlike beer, ice is often added to Malta when consumed. A popular way Latin Americans sometimes drink Malta is by mixing it with condensed or evaporated milk.

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Nowadays, most Malta is brewed in the Caribbean and can be purchased in areas with substantial Caribbean populations. Aside from the islands of the Caribbean, Malta is also popular in Caribbean coastal areas such as Panama, Colombia, and Venezuela and countries that share a Caribbean coast. Malta is brewed worldwide, and is popular in many parts of Africa like Nigeria, Chad, Ghana, Cameroon, and in the Indian Ocean. This beverage is also popular in several parts of Europe, especially Germany. Malta Guinness is brewed under license internationally.

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Malta originated in Germany as Malzbier (“malt beer”), a malty dark beer whose fermentation was interrupted at approximately 2% ABV, leaving quite a lot of residual sugars in the finished beer. Up to the 1950s, Malzbier was considered a fortifying food for nursing mothers, recovering patients, the elderly etc. Malzbier in its native form was finally superseded during the 1960s by its modern form, formulated from water, glucose syrup, malt extract and hops extract, which had been on the market since the malta_001latter half of the 19th century, notably in Denmark. Such formulated drinks are to be called Malztrunk (“malt beverage”) according to German law, since they aren’t fermented. In colloquial use, Malzbier has nevertheless remained, along with other nicknames such as Kinderbier (“children’s beer”). Some native Malzbiere can still be enjoyed in Germany, notably in Cologne, where the taps of breweries Malzmühle and Sion sell it alongside their traditional Kölsch. Many German breweries have a Malta in their range, sometimes produced under licence (for example Vitamalz).

Malta is also occasionally called “champagne cola” by some brands. However, there is a separate type of drink with this b26398db-f1b6-4a2a-87d5-0d2169d04484_1.99b73500672fb55ba1b255fd57652b09name, having a flavour and consistency more akin to cream soda. Despite this appellation, neither drink is a champagne or a cola.

Due to its distinctive colour, Malta is sometimes known as black brewed beer.

Malta is high in B vitamins. Some breweries, like Albani Brewery of Denmark, fortify their non-alcoholic Malta beverages with Vitamin B complex. Albani Brewery claims on their website to have been the first brewery to create non-alcoholic malt beverages in 1859.

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Generally speaking, Malta is readily available in stores in Latin America. It is, however, a little more difficult to find in the United States and Canada.

The History of Lutefisk

An article found on whatscookingamerica.netLutefisk_01

It is said that about half the Norwegians who immigrated to America came in order to escape the hated lutefisk and the other half came to spread the gospel of lutefisk’s wonderfulness.

– Norwegian-American saying

Lutefisk History

Lutefisk (pronounced lewd-uh-fisk) is dried cod that has been soaked in a lye solution for several days to rehydrate it.  It is rinsed with cold water to remove the lye, then boiled or baked, and then served with butter, salt, and pepper.

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The finished lutefisk usually is the consistency of Jello.  It is also called lyefish, and in the United States, Norwegian-Americans traditionally serve it for Thanksgiving and Christmas.  In many Norwegian homes, lutefisk takes the place of the Christmas turkey.  In Minnesota and Wisconsin, you can find lutefisk in local food stores and even at some restaurants. It is a food that you either love or hate, and, as some people say, “Once a year is probably enough!”

During the fall in Wisconsin, people watch their local newspapers for announcements of lutefisk suppers, which are usually held in Norwegian churches.  Usually every Norwegian church will host at least one lutefisk supper between October and the end of the year.  The dinners have become so popular that lovers of this special cod dish drive great distances, and these are not just people of Scandinavian descent.

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The history of lutefisk dates back to the Vikings.  On one occasion, according to one legend, plundering Vikings burned down a fishing village, including the wooden racks with drying cod.  The returning villagers poured water on the racks to put out the fire.  Ashes covered the dried fish, and then it rained.  The fish buried in the ashes in the ashes thus became soaked in a lye slush.  Later the villagers were surprised to see that the dried fish had changed to what looked like fresh fish.  They rinsed the fish in water to remove the lye and make it edible, and then boiled it.  The story is that one particularly brave villager tasted the fish and declared it “not bad.”

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Norwegian-Americans believe that lutefisk was brought by their ancestors on the ships when they came to America, and that it was all they had to eat.  Today the fish is celebrated in ethnic and religious celebrations and is linked with hardship and courage.


In general I love traditional Norwegian food, both the food eaten during celebrating Christmas and the traditional food eaten the year round. Having said as much that love does not embrace lutefisk, but if it is served with enough crispy bacon and mushy peas as it usually is here in Norway I do eat it.

Ted
Winking smile

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Faygo

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Faygo Beverages, Inc., is a soft drink company headquartered in Detroit, Michigan. The beverages produced by the company, branded as Faygo or Faygo Pop, are distributed in the Midwest, Mid-Atlantic, Central Southern regions of the United States, and southern Canada. Faygo is imported in Europe by American Fizz, an official distributor of Faygo. Faygo Beverages, Inc., is a wholly owned subsidiary of the National Beverage Corporation, started in Detroit, Michigan, in 1907, as Feigenson Brothers Bottling Works.

History

Faygo_10The Feigenson brothers, who developed Faygo, were originally bakers from Russia. Faygo first became available in 1907 in bottles with only three flavors: grape, strawberry, and fruit punch. These flavors were based on the Feigenson brothers’ cake frosting recipe. They charged three cents for one bottle, and five cents for two bottles. The brothers bought their first delivery truck in 1922, and started home deliveries the following year. They also introduced a low-calorie version in the 1960s called Ohana. In the 1980s they introduced flavored carbonated water.

Faygo_03In the 1920s as the company expanded, they thought the brand name “Feigenson Brothers” was too long and changed it to Faygo. The brothers ran the company until the mid-1960s, when they turned it over to their sons. In 1969, the company created a series of radio and television advertisements featuring a fictional cowboy called the Faygo Kid, who was portrayed in animation for television commercials for Faygo Old-Fashioned Root Beer.

Faygo_06Because the drink had a limited shelf life, the company only sold its products in Michigan until the late 1950s. Company chemists later resolved this issue by installing a filtration system to remove impurities from the manufacturing plant’s water system. In the 1960s, the soda’s regional popularity expanded when the company began advertising during broadcasts of Detroit Tigers games. Commercials produced in the 1970s featured “everyday people” on the Boblo Boat singing the “Faygo Boat Song”. Tree Sweet Products Corp. sold the company to National Beverage Corp. in 1987. In 2007, Faygo celebrated its 100th anniversary.

Reception

Faygo_05Faygo brands were praised in the September 2009 issue of Bon Appétit magazine, ranking Faygo Root Beer as the best tasting American root beer, describing it as “dry and crisp, with a frothy head, a good bite and a long finish”.

In pop culture

Faygo_09The horrorcore group Insane Clown Posse references Faygo in several of their songs. Positive audience reaction to an early concert performance in which Violent J threw an open bottle at a row of hecklers resulted in the group continuing to spray their audiences with the drink. They repeated this practice which developed into the Juggalo culture’s “Faygo Showers”.

Rapper Isaiah Rashad references peach Faygo on his album Cilvia Demo in the song “Brad Jordan”.

Rapper Machine Gun Kelly references Faygo in his mixtape album Black Flag in the song “Street Dreams”.

Rapper Eminem also mentions Faygo in at least 2 songs; ‘As the World Turns’ (Slim Shady LP) and ‘Marshall Mathers’ (The Marshall Mathers LP)

The character Gamzee Makara in Andrew Hussie’s webcomic Homestuck is notorious for his addiction to Faygo soda, as mentioned numerous times in the comic.

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Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – R. White’s Lemonade

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - R. White’s LemonadeR. White’s Lemonade is a brand of a carbonated soft drink, which is produced and sold in the UK by Britvic.

R. White’s is a brand of lemonade that has been produced for over 150 years. Robert and Mary White produced the first R. White’s lemonade in Camberwell, London, in 1845. The White Family took over H.D.Rawlings Ltd., in 1891, the year that it was incorporated, and then R.White & Sons Ltd., was itself incorporated in 1894.

In the 1970s, R White’s also made orangeade, dandelion & burdock and cream soda. R. White’s still contains real lemons and is available as a diet, cloudy or clear drink.

The Company was taken over by Whitbreads in the 1960s, and was later absorbed by the Britvic Corporation in 1986 when Britvic and Canada Dry Rawlings Ltd, merged. This product, formerly made using real sugar, has (as of 2006) changed the traditional recipe replacing sugar with Aspartame, Saccharin & Acesulfame K.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - R. White’s Lemonade

Stables, South Island Place, Brixton, 1964. The R White’s lemonade bottle in the foreground was an icon of London life at the time. The bottle was made from thick glass and was returned to the store where it was purchased, a deposit then refunded. The screw top was made of bakelite, not plastic.

Memorable marketing

1973 saw the launch of the brand’s most famous advertising campaign, ‘The Secret Lemonade Drinker’, which remained on screen until 1984. The ad featured a man in striped pyjamas creeping downstairs to raid the fridge for R Whites Lemonade. Ross MacManus (the father of singer Elvis Costello) wrote and sang the original song with his teenage son, providing backing vocals. The ad won a silver award at the 1974 International Advertising Festival.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - R. White’s Lemonade

Who can forget John Otway looking like Hank Marvin sneaking down the stairs singing “I’m a secret lemonade drinker” Then the chorus “R Whites, R Whites, R Whites lemonade” A Classic advert!

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - R. White’s Lemonade

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Mr PiBB

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Mr PiBB

Mr. PiBB was born in the summer of 1972 after The Coca-Cola Company had the intention of creating a drink that would rival the growing success of Dr Pepper in Southern markets.  After losing a law suit filed by Dr Pepper manufacturers who disputed Coke’s original use Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Mr PiBBof the name “Peppo,” Coke settled on the name “Mr. PiBB” for important brand-identification purposes.  A combination of an abbreviated formal title and a one-word surname would serve the purpose of helping consumers associate the new product with the “Dr Pepper-type” flavor.

On June 28, 1972, Coke began test-marketing Mr. PiBB in Dr Pepper’s own backyard (Time, July 3 1972, pg. 40).  Among the first cities chosen were Waco and Temple, Texas and Columbus, Starkville and West Point, Mississippi.  The following week, the new product was introduced in Texarkana, Texas and within a couple of months, Mr. PiBB appeared in Houston, Galveston, and Tyler, Texas.  Later that year, they extended distribution to include some Southern and Mid-Western states (Arkansas, Tennessee, Kansas and Georgia).

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Mr PiBBWithin a couple of years, Mr. PiBB was available in most states East of the Mississippi River and some West-Coast states including California, Oregon and Washington.  Even though Mr. PiBB was unable to equal the overwhelmingly tremendous popularity of Dr Pepper, Coke was able to gain valuable soda market-share points during this time through the introduction of the new brand.

In the first several years of Mr. PiBB’s existence, Coke placed the description, “Blended Flavored (Cherry and Other Flavorings) Carbonated Beverage” on all Mr. PiBB products for consumer identification purposes.  Mr. PiBB was first marketed with the slogan “It Goes Down Good,” which was printed on the original brown and yellow steel cans and point of sale (POS) promotional materials.  Some other advertising pieces during this time included variations of the slogan, namely “With the Easy Taste that Goes Down Good,” and “Smooth and Easy It Goes Down Good.”  “Rise Up With Mr. PiBB” was also used.

The first internal Coca-Cola Company promotion for the brand was titled “Private Air Force for Mr. PiBB.”  Coke authorized the production of gift items with the “Private Air Force for Mr. PiBB” logo to be used as incentives for Coke representatives to Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Mr PiBBmeet sales goals, set up displays and successfully merchandise the product.  For more information about the “Private Air Force” promotion, and the Mr. PiBB hot-air balloon flown during the drink’s introduction, click here.

In 1975, Coke changed the color of the Mr. PiBB can to red.  This was due to consumer preference research which concluded that the original brownish color used gave off the impression to the consumer that Mr. PiBB was a form of root beer, a dangerous marketing mistake since Coke’s goal was to capitalize on Dr Pepper’s taste distinction.

Throughout the late 1970’s, Coke spent millions of dollars trying to bolster Mr. PiBB name recognition among consumers.  Comedians George Burns and David Brenner were hired to shoot Mr. Pibb television commercials.  The Mr. Pibb logo was posted in Motocross racing Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Mr PiBBevents and Joie Chitwood stunt shows with hopes of picking up greater market share in one of the most important regional markets for spicy cherry soft drinks – the US South. There was a sharp increase in print, television and radio advertising, using new slogans such as “Have A PiBB Mister.”

In April 1980, Coke, intending to increase sales, redesigned the formula of Mr. PiBB and marketed cans and packaging with “New Taste” printed in bold yellow lettering.  Coca-Cola conducted the “1980’s: A New Taste Odyssey” sweepstakes for their employees to encourage field support of the improved product.  For complete details about Mr. PiBB’s new taste and the sweepstakes, click here.

However, Mr. PiBB was never able to threaten the predominance of Dr Pepper, which was a “first-to-market” product, establishing Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Mr PiBBprimary name-recognition among consumers in the “cherry-flavored” soft drink category.  Dr Pepper had almost a 100-year head start to win over the minds of the average drinker.  Some industry estimates have had Dr Pepper outselling Mr. PiBB at a ratio of 17-to-1 (much of this disparity, though, is due to Mr. PiBB’s non-national distribution).

In the early 1980’s, Coke realized an opportunity to form a strategic partnership with the Dr Pepper Company which exchanged use of superior Coca-Cola bottling facilities for a share in Dr Pepper sales profits.  Only in regions of the country where Pepsi or 7up outbid Coke for this right did Coke resort to the production of Mr. PiBB.  This limited production meant less time and energy spent by Coke on marketing for Mr. PiBB, which explains why Mr. PiBB promotional material and packaging from the 1980’s and beyond is more difficult to find today.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Mr PiBB

The original Mr. PiBB logo – referred to as “Generation 1” – that was created in 1972 was used for over 18 years.  With exception of a few color changes and the use of just “PiBB” in the late 1970’s and 1980’s, the font and style remained the same.  In 1991, Coke decided to redesign the Mr. PiBB logo (Generation 2).  This was a very short-lived design because of a law suit filed in late 1992 which alleged that the new diagonal styling on cans and bottles looked too much like Dr Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Mr PiBBPepper’s.  It was soon replaced by a new, fancier design in 1993 (Generation 3).  The next year, the Mr. PiBB head character was added to the 1993 design (Generation 4) which again, only lasted for a couple years.  It was at this time when the slogan “Put it in Your Head” was introduced and Coke placed Mr. PiBB in McDonald’s fountain drink accounts nationwide.  The Generation 5 design was adopted in 1996 (with minor revisions in 1998) and retained the “Put it in Your Head” concept.

Mr. PiBB has been produced in many different sizes of cans and bottles. Over the years, there have existed 8oz, 280ml, 12oz and 16oz steel and aluminum cans, as well as 8oz, 10oz, 300ml, 12oz, 16oz, 26oz, 32oz, 33.8oz (1 litre), 48oz, 64oz and 67.6oz (2 litre) glass bottles. Plastic bottles have also been made in 20oz, .5 litre, 1 litre and 2 litre sizes.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Mr PiBB

On June 26, 2001, the history of Mr. PiBB took yet another dramatic turn.  The Coca Cola Company introduced a new version of Mr. PiBB – “Pibb Xtra” – into several Texas test-markets, including Houston and Dallas.  Several months later, Pibb Xtra made its way into other states, namely Kansas and Missouri. Currently, the new version exists in multiple prominent bottling territories. 

Text from pibbthug.com

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Ironbeer

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Ironbeer is a soft drink that originated in Cuba in 1917 and was created by Manuel Rabanal. It has been described as tasting like “a fruitier Dr Pepper” or like Ironport soda. After Fidel Castro became Cuba’s leader and oversaw Ironbeer_04nationalization of private property in 1960, “Inversiones Rabanal” run by Jesus Larrazabal (husband of Teresa Rabanal – Manuel’s daughter) along with the Ironbeer of Cuba families (Rabanal, Larrazabal, Rojas) were exiled in Miami.

The U.S. version of Ironbeer Softdrink, without the 500 pounds (230 kg) bell on logo, is owned and operated by the Blanco Family.

Ironbeer_06In 1991, Ironbeer’s sister company, Sunshine Bottling, got into a business venture with Tropicana, which was looking for a new bottling company. Ironbeer then invested heavily into expanding Sunshine Bottling Co. to get it ready for the demands of this really enormous contract.

Tropicana ended up owning a bottling company by ways of an acquisition and the Sunshine Bottling deal was no longer neededTropicanas people made a demand about the percentage of air in each can of their orange juice – an impossible Ironbeer_02demand, industry experts said, and one outside the terms of their contract – and extricated themselves from it.

Ironbeer’s CEO, Pedro Blanco Sr., sued Tropicana and eventually won a considerable sum for production costs and damages, but not before the huge legal bills sent Ironbeer into bankruptcy court. They emerged from bankruptcy in 1999.

The softdrink along with a few others and the Sunchy line of juices is still being bottle in Miami by Sunshine Bottling Company. The company is still currently owned and operated by president and CEO Carlos Blanco Sr., Pedro Blanco Sr. has since died.

ironbeer_01Ironbeer cans give the following story about its origins:
On a summers afternoon, in 1917 a mule-drawn, wooden wagon arrived at a popular cafeteria in Havana, Cuba. It delivered the first four cases of a new soft drink that would soon be called “The National Beverage”. Now more than 80 years later, Ironbeer is still enjoyed for its refreshing flavor with just a hint of island spices. A lot can change over the years – but not the original flavor of Ironbeer.

A Short History of Le Croque Monsieur

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The French name Croque Monsieur translates to  “Crisp Mister” and is basically a cooked cheese and ham sandwich, traditionally made with gruyere cheese and thinly sliced ham.  The name is sometimes shortened to just Croque.

The First Croque Monsieur

croque monsieur_02The first Croque Monsieur was simply a hot ham and cheese sandwich which was fried in butter – one step further than what some believe was the original which was accidentally created when French workers left the tins containing their lunches of  sandwiches on  hot radiators  whilst they worked. By the time they came to eat them, the heat of the radiators had melted the cheese.

croque monsieur_03It’s not known who had the idea of embellishing the recipe by frying the sandwich until crisp and golden,  however they first  appeared on menus in Parisian cafés in 1910, and the earliest written reference is thought to have been by the novelist Proust in his 1918 work titled  À la recherche du temps perdu  (In search of lost time).

Today’s Croque Monsieur

Over the years, further changes were made to the basic recipe, in particular the addition of mustard and a béchamel sauce. Whilst this complicated an otherwise simple recipe, versions made this way are sumptuous and relatively filling  and well worth the extra attention. 

Then came the variations including:
The addition of a fried egg served on top – a Croque Madame
The addition of tomatoes – a Croque Provençal
The substitution of  blue cheese for Gruyere – a Croque Auvergnat
The substitution of smoked salmon for the ham – a Croque Norvégien

Simpel Croque Monsieur Recipes

A simple version would be to make a cheese and ham sandwich in the usual way, then fry in butter until crisp and golden on both sides. Alternatively, spread the outside on your sandwich with plenty of butter and cook under a very hot grill until well browned on both sides.

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Text from recipes4us

The History Of Tapas

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The Spanish practice of going out for tapas – called el tapeo – had its The history Of Tapas_02humble beginnings long ago and ironically originally involved empty plates. Widely thought to have gotten its start in Seville, bartenders would cover – or tapar – wine glasses with a small plate in order to protect the drink from fruit flies. Soon, they took to placing a simple slice of ham on top of this place, an addition which naturally appealed to bar patrons. Seeing the possibility of attracting more customers, the bar-owners began varying the tapas adorning the little plates that came with each drink, and the widespread national phenomenon known as tapas got its start.

Traditions

The history Of Tapas_03Going out for tapas is one of the few phenomenal gastronomic experiences that doesn’t involve a table cloth and a pricey sit-down meal. The way to enjoy tapas is to stand at the bar with a group of friends, share a few different tapas, and wash them down with wine or beer. Afterwards, pick a new bar, a new spread of tapas, and repeat the process. You can easily see why, when the conversation is lively and the tapas delicious, this advanced art of snacking can certainly substitute a whole meal.

Typical Tapas

The history Of Tapas_05Don’t be shy about asking what order as most bars will suggest that you try their specialties, which usually happen to be the region’s specialties as well. Tapas menus undeniably vary as you move through Spain; the best tapas in central Madrid, for example, are sure to be different from the choice tapas along the northern Galician shores. However, regardless of whether you’re relaxing along the Mediterranean or channelling your inner Don Quijote in La Mancha, you are sure to find some common tapas “classics.”

The history Of Tapas_04

As Spain is located on the Iberian peninsula and therefore very nearly surrounded by water, seafood and shellfish naturally play a huge part in Spanish gastronomy. A few delicacies of the sea to try are calamares (fried squid), cod fritters, gambas pil-pil (prawns in hot, garlic oil), and boquerones (anchovies). Moving away from seafood, other typical tapas include chorizo (sausage), paella (rice dish), a variety of casserole stews, callos (tripe with chickpeas), jamón serrano (cured ham), albóndigas (meatballs) and the ever classic tortilla española (Spanish potato omelette).

Text fra Enforex

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Nichol Kola

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Nichol Kola

In the 2010 edition of Soda Spectrum, contributor Blair Matthews writes “there’s hardly a trace of what was once such a successful and lucrative cola brand.” But searching is our thing… so we searched. We consulted Eric Wideman, “the nation’s expert on Nichol Kola,” according to his boss, Orca Beverage President Mike Bourgeois. And based on the information we’ve gathered from Wideman, I believe it. I mean what an absurdly specific thing to be obsessed with: a soda Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Nichol Kolathat started in 1936. Personally I am obsessed with Natalie and Tonya… but they’re not talking to me anymore. Anyway, here’s what Wideman relayed to us about Nichol Cola:

first there was Sun-Boc, then there was Ver-Vac, Pow! World War I – sugar problems – yadda, yadda, yadda. And now here we are years later with Orca Beverage resurrecting a forgotten brand. Got it? Good. Peace out. Jk. God, for how long it took us to write this, we are doing it in the most annoying way possible. Here’s a synopsis of the soda’s history as written in the book The House of Quality: The History of the H.R. Nicholson Company by Harry R. Nicholson. Wideman sent us excerpts from this extremely rare publication.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Nichol KolaWe do know it’s a real thing though because we found it online in Australia’s National Library. Go figure. Harry R. Nicholson was a business man. Dude was savvy back in the early 1900’s. With prohibition on the rise, he created Sun-Boc an amber not-quite-beer that became a hit with people looking for something to replace their former definitely-real-beer. After Sun-Boc’s success, Nicholson invested that money into a cola he called Ver-Vac designed to compete with Coca Cola. Well Ver-Vac, despite maybe being the worst-named soda I’ve ever heard of, was a hit. Nicholson raked in $110,000 from investors to go all-in on it. And then he hit a road block called World War I, which led to sugar rationing and a spike in sugar’s price.

Here’s the big problem with that; sugar is a huge part of soda and the amount of sugar businesses “were allotted was based on their usage before the rationing” and since Ver-Vac was a relatively new venture, Nicholson didn’t get anywhere close to enough of it to run a soda business. After a bad business deal on sugar and then the sudden stoppage of the war, Ver-Vac’s fizz as a company went flat. In 1926, Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Nichol KolaNicholson gave cola a shot again, this time branding it as “Nichol Kola” to compete with brands like Pepsi. He would sell the concentrate to independent bottlers who would then mix it up and sell it. Guess how much each bottle sold for?

Nichol Kola continued into the 1970’s, but as independent bottlers fell by the wayside, there were fewer and fewer businesses to which the company could sell their soda’s concentrate. The trend continued until Nichol Kola met the same fate as Ver-Vac. But in 2006 Orca Beverage revamped the brand. If you haven’t read past reviews, Orca Beverage is a large soda manufacturer and distributer based out of Mukilteo, Washington. Their “thing,” if you will, is buying up vintage brands no longer in production and putting them back on shelves.

Bourgeois tells us about his company, “We do that because our specialty is vintage soda. We just want to consolidate as many in-house as we can.” The current incantation of Nichol Kola is not the original formula. When asked to describe today’s recipe, Bourgeois played it pretty close to the vest, but pointed out cinnamon and coriander as ingredients used. He also says there are ingredients in it “that typically aren’t found in colas anymore.” Alright, history lesson over. We finally got that part out of the way. Now let’s drink this damn thing.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Nichol Kola

Text from fivestarsoda.com

A Short History of Airline Meals

The History of Airline Meals

Through the late 1930s, inflight dining on U.S. airlines often meant free cigarettes and box lunches of cold fried chicken, as the airplane heaved and bounced through the sky. Stewardesses were instructed to act as nurses, administering aspirin and cordials to anxious passengers. But in post-War years as planes grew larger and reached higher altitudes, more comfortable pressurized cabins became the norm and a golden age of airline dining was ushered in.

The History of Airline Meals

A promotional Pan Am video from 1958 showcases white tablecloths and hors d’ouevre trays, boasting that “the travail has been taken out of travel” with gourmet meals “prepared in simultaneously operating galleys, where dishes can be cooked in five-minute ovens.”

The History of Airline Meals

Until 1978, Congress had regulated the airline industry, mandating identical ticket prices for each given route and casting mile-high cuisine as a way for carriers to compete for passengers.

Albright College history professor Guillaume de Syon pinpoints 1973 as a watershed moment for in-flight dining, when French airline UTA recruited chef Raymond Oliver to reevaluate their menus. Acknowledging that dry cabin air dulls the palate and dehydration decreases the effectiveness of taste buds, Oliver prescribed a menu of coq au vin, beef bourguignon and veal in cream sauce—hearty, drenched in thick sauce, and well-suited to reheating.  (Although he didn’t know it then, recent studies show that loud background noise also mutes our perception of flavor.)

The History of Airline Meals

While variations of Oliver’s meat-and-sauce continue to appear on the trays of cabin-trapped passengers around the globe, last April, landlubber diners clamored to pay £50 a head at British Airways’ London pop-up restaurant Flight BA2012. The three-course meals were inspired by the airlines’ 1948 first-class menu.

In the cost-cutting years post-September 11, many airlines migrated to BYOF status. To live vicariously through the plastic trays of air travelers around the world, check out airlinemeals.net.

The History of Airline Meals

From an article by Erica Berry posted on NowhereMagazine

In context:

The world’s worst airline meals
The 10 most regrettable airline meals ever
Five myths about airline food
The best airline meals, according to an in-flight food addict
Wikipedia: Airline meal

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Kist and Chocolate Soldier

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday

The Citrus Products Company was founded in 1919 in Chicago, Illinois. Two of their products, Kist and Chocolate Soldier* are familiar brands of The Citrus Company.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday

Soda & Soft Drink SaturdayLike most soft drink companies, they experimented with different flavors to try and find their niche in the market. Kist was bottled in a wide range of flavors like orange, ginger ale, lemon and grape, and became very popular. They also offered a complete range of bottle sizes including seven ounce, ten ounce and twelve ounce, and also two family sizes.

*Chocolate Soldier

By 1958 Kist was being bottled by franchised bottlers in every state.  In addition to Kist, Citrus Products constantly pushed another product to franchised bottlers that was called Chocolate Soldier. Chocolate Soldier,  a chocolate milk type beverage, grew steadily in sales volume, with the help of the parent company, by providing bottlers with sales and advertising materials. Probably the only thing that stands out in the advertising of Chocolate Soldier is some signs which show a soldier standing at attention

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday

*There was once an unfathomable array of chocolate drinks and chocolate sodas. What happened? Today Yoo-hoo remains, but its competition has fallen on the beverage battlefield. Take Chocolate Soldier, for example, which could not win the soft drink wars despite its nifty name and cute packaging.

 In Context 1:

The Chocolate Soldier (German title: Der tapfere Soldat or Der Praliné-Soldat) is an operetta composed in 1908 by Oscar Straus (1870–1954) based on George Bernard Shaw’s 1894 play, Arms and the Man. The German language libretto is by Rudolf Bernauer and Leopold Jacobson. It premiered on 14 November 1908 at the Theater an der Wien.

Chocolate Soldier

English versions were successful on Broadway and in London, beginning in 1909. The first film adaptation was in 1915. The 1941 film of the same name enlists much of Straus’s music but is otherwise unrelated, using a plot based on Ferenc Molnár’s play Testőr.

In Context 2:

Chocolate Soldier is an expression referring to a good-looking but useless warrior. The term originates as a derogatory label for a soldier who would not fight but would look good in a uniform, shortened from ‘Chocolate Cream Soldier’. It appears in that form in the 1897 book Soldier of Fortune by Richard Harding Davis.

History of Caesar Salad

The History of Caesar Salad_01

Caesar Salad is probably one of the best known salads along with Waldorf and Greek salads, but with so many variations being made and served today, the original recipe has escaped many chefs, so let’s start with the true recipe for a Caesar Salad.

Original Recipe

Worcestershire sauceThe recipe consisted of romaine or similar long crisp lettuce leaves, garlic croutons and shavings of parmesan cheese all tossed in a creamy dressing made of egg, olive oil, vinegar and/or lemon juice, garlic, Worcestershire sauce, salt and pepper. 

Contrary to popular belief, the original Caesar salad recipe did not contain pieces of anchovy.  Perhaps modern versions include them because the original did have a slight anchovy flavour, however this came from Worcestershire sauce.  It is believed that the inventor was opposed to using anchovies in his salad. It is also believed that originally,  the lettuce leaves were often served whole  because it was meant to be lifted by the stem and eaten with the fingers.

Who Invented Caesar Salad

The History of Caesar Salad_02If you thought the name derives from the great Caesars of Rome, and you had notions of Julius Caser, Caligula or Nero tucking into this wonderful dish,  then you may be disappointed to know it was invented many centuries later by a chef called Caesar Cardini (1896-1956).

Although there are several stories about exactly how the salad was invented,  there is one fact which is undisputable, namely that Cardini most certainly created it in Tijuana, Mexico in the 1920s.

The History of Caesar Salad_03

One version states that due to prohibition, many film stars would take the short trip over the border to relax and party,  especially wealthy socialites and the Hollywood crowd.  One 4th July, Cardini’s restaurant was inundated with guests wanting to celebrate, which quickly ran down the kitchen’s supplies, so Cardini had to make do with what he had left, and made up the salad with the additional flair of  tossing it himself at the tables of the guests.

Over the years, driving to Tijuana for a Caesar Salad became the rage.  Not only did Hollywood stars such as Clark Gable, Jean Harlow, and W. C. Fields make the pilgrimage, but so did gossip columnists who subsequently wrote about it in their columns.

Clark Gable

Today’s Caesar Salad Variations

Today, there are many variations including the addition of grilled chicken, strips of steak, salmon or prawns (shrimp) which make them ideal as a light main course rather than as a starter or side salad.

Text from recipes4us

The Forgotten, Fascinating Saga Of Crisco

crisco_03

Crisco, you may recall, was made from partially hydrogenated vegetable oil, a process that turned cottonseed oil (and later, soybean oil) from a liquid into a solid, like lard, that was perfect for baking and frying. Unfortunately, these wonderful qualities depended on “trans fats” that have since been implicated in heart disease. As a result, crisco_01partially hydrogenated oils have fallen out of favor in the food industry. Even Crisco changed its recipe, cutting the amount of transfats in one serving to less than .5 grams. That allows Crisco’s label to state that it contains zero transfats.

But did you know that in the 1980s, health activists actually promoted oils containing trans fats? They considered such oils a healthy alternative to the saturated fats found in palm oil, coconut oil, or beef fat. In 1986, for instance, the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), described Burger King’s switch to partially hydrogenated oils as “a great boon to Americans’ arteries.”

David Schleifer, a scholar at Columbia University’s Center on Medicine as a Profession, lays out the story in the January issue of the journal Technology and Culture (and, more briefly, here). According to crisco_02Schleifer, pressure from these activists was crucial in persuading fast-food chains to drop palm oil or beef fat in favor of partially hydrogenated soybean oil.

In the mid-1990s, CSPI and other health activists changed their tune as scientific studies turned up evidence that trans fats increased artery-clogging forms of cholesterol.

This led to yet another odd twist, which Schleifer explores in a separate article. Big food companies mobilized to debunk this claim, funding a study of their own. They expected it to demonstrate that trans fats had no such harmful effect.

To their dismay, the study confirmed the earlier results. The companies felt compelled to look, once again, for different, healthier, oils. The potato chip industry, for instance, went for a version of sunflower oil with higher levels of oleic acid. As Schleifer puts it: “Industry meddles with science, but science meddles with industry.”

Text from http://www.npr.org/

The History of Rowntree’s Fruit Gums & Pastilles

Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_04

Rowntree’s Fruit Pastilles

Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_05Rowntree’s Fruit Pastilles are small round sweets measuring about 1.5 cm (0.6 in) in diameter; they have a jelly-like consistency, due to the gelatin they are made from, and are covered with sugar. They contain fruit juice, have no artificial colours or flavours, and come in five flavours: lemon (yellow), lime (green), strawberry (red), blackcurrant (purple) and orange (orange).

History

At Rowntree’s factory in Fawdon, Tyneside in 1881, Rowntree introduced Fruit Pastilles, and the product proved to be a great success, accounting for about 25 percent of the company’s tonnage by 1887.

Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_06Packaging

Tubes of Fruit Pastilles are wrapped in foil-backed paper (paper on the inside, foil on the outside) with a paper wrapper over the top. The paper wrapper is green in colour with “Fruit Pastilles” written along the front in large lettering. Along the bottom of the lettering there are pictures of different types of fruit all relating to the flavours within the packet, The top bears the “Rowntree’s” brand name. Fruit Pastilles come in a small pack weighing 52.5 grams (1.85 oz), containing 14 pastilles, but are also available in larger bags weighing 180 grams (6.3 oz). They are also available in boxes and larger round cardboard tubes.

Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_02Marketing and Advertising

The 1972 television advertising campaign used the song Pistol Packin’ Mama with the tag line “Pastille Pickin’ Mama, pass those pastilles round”.

To drive awareness of the 25% fruit juice recipe in Fruit Pastilles, Rowntree conducted a 105-day experimental marketing campaign. At family events, top-end grocers and service stations they invited families to join in their ‘What Can Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_03You Do But Chew?’ talent shows, tying in with the brand’s sponsorship of Britain’s Got Talent. 427,240 product samples were distributed as brand ambassadors tried to engage parents with the ‘25% fruit juice’ message. 93% of the consumers involved said they’d had a positive shift in brand perception, whilst more than half were ‘highly likely’ to purchase post campaign.[3]

A more recent TV commercial shows a man about to chew on a Fruit Pastille when he is surrounded by medieval people who declare whether he’d chew the pastille or go out on a date with a fair maiden. In the end he has to chew. The commercial concludes with the message “Rowntree’s Fruit Pastilles with real fruit flavour. You can’t help but chew!”

Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_01

A commercial from the 1980s has recently been revived, featuring a child daring a basketball player to not chew on a pastille. The slogan from the previous ad is still used.

Rowntree’s Fruit Gums

Roundtrees_01Rowntree’s Fruit Gums are circular sweets formerly made by Rowntree’s, who were later acquired by Nestlé. There were five flavours, each of a different colour: strawberry, orange, lemon, blackcurrant and lime. The sweets were introduced in 1893, and originally marketed as Rowntree’s Clear Gums – “The nation’s favourite sweet” – and were available in twopenny tubes and sixpenny packets.[1] In addition to the traditional roll packaging, they were available in a larger-volume box containing the sweets in the shape of the fruit or part of the fruit that the flavour represents.

Roundtrees_02Ingredients

Fruit Gums are primarily composed of glucose syrup and fruit juices and are therefore similar to wine gums (another British confectionery item). Originally the purple fruit gums were referred to as “blusterberry”, but this changed to blackcurrant in the 1990s after a failed advertising campaign.

“Don’t Forget the Fruit Gums, Mum”

An advertising campaign for the gums that ran for three years from 1958 to 1961 included the slogan “Don’t Forget the Fruit Gums, Mum”. The slogan was invented by the copywriter Roger Musgrave (1929-2007).

Roundtrees_04

The television advert featured a young boy reminding his mother to buy fruit gums as she leaves to go shopping. The advert claims that “[Fruit Gums] last all day” and that “Rowntree’s Fruit Gums last the longest”. This referred to the number of sweets in the tube.