1860s Crab Apple Jelly / Villeplegele fra 1860tallet

A historic wild fruit recipe found on World Turn’d Upside Down
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Stephanie Ann Farra who runs ‘World Turn’d Upside Down‘ writes: When Pehr Kalm, a Swedish-Finnish naturalist, visited Pennsylvania in the 1750s, he remarked that crab apples were plentiful but were not good for anything but making vinegar. Crab apples have a reputation of being a useless fruit and a nuisance. As Pehr Kalm suggested, I had actually intended to make vinegar out of my collection.

Once the tweeting birds were replaced with squawking crows, too close for comfort, I decided I had enough to make a small container of vinegar and one of preserves of some kind. I took the collection home and rinsed it in a few washes. I was still unsure of what kind of preserve I wanted to make. I was stuck between making marmalade and jelly. I ended up making jelly because more people would enjoy it.

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Chinese Pears / Kinesiske Pærer

A classic French dessert recipe found in “Mat For Alle Årstider”
(Food For All Seasons) published by Det Beste in 1977
Chinese Pears / Kinesiske Pærer

Pears, Raisins, hazelnuts, honey, golden syrup, white wine and redcurrant jelly sounds like a match made in heaven for anyone who regard the dessert as the highlight of the meal. Someone like me – Ted  😉

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Quince and Geranium Jelly / Kvede og Geranium Gelé

A classic English preserve recipe found in
“Harrods Cookery Book” published in 1985

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The golden, down-covered quince changes color when it is cooked to give a pinkish-amber jelly. This autumnal fruit is high in pectin and is therefore ideal for jams, jellies and preserves. For an English touch to a meal, serve with meat or poultry.

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Traditional Blackberry Jelly / Tradisjonell Bjørnebærgelé

A traditional jelly recipe found on about.com/food/
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There has to be some compensation for the disappearance of summer and the sunshine. The abundance of wonderful autumn fruits, vegetables and berries do a great job. From September onwards it is possible to pick from a an abundance including sloes, bilberries, plums, pumpkins, and  wild mushroooms and fat juicy blackberries.

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Jane Austen’s Flummery

A dessert recipe inspired by Jane Austen’s novels
found in historyextra.com
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Whether it’s breakfast at Northanger Abbey, tea and cake at Mansfield Park, or one of Mrs Bennet’s dinners to impress, food is an important theme in Jane Austen’s novels. And now, Austen fans can recreate the dishes featured in the author’s works, thanks to new book “Dinner with Mr Darcy” by Pen Vogler

Flummery is a white jelly, which was set in elegant molds or as shapes in clear jelly. Its delicate, creamy taste goes particularly well with rhubarb, strawberries, and raspberries. A modern version would be to add the puréed fruit to the ingredients, taking away the same volume of water.

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Pancake Cake / Pannekakekake

A delicious Norwegian recipe found in “Cappelens Kokebok”
(Cappelen’s Kook Book) published in 1991
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There are many ways to serve pancakes.
This is one of the nicest ones – Ted

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Queen Jam / Dronningsyltetøy

A classic Norwegian jam recipe found in “Sylting og Dypfrysing”
(Jam Making and Deep-freezing) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1981

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Back in the fifties and sixties when I was a kid most families around where we lived headed for the mountains or the woodlands to pick berries as soon as they were ripe. My family picked raspberries, lingonberries,coudberries and blueberries every year and my mom would make jams and jellies. Strawberries and apples were bought around the same time and and they ended up as jams and jellies too.

Anyone who have tasted homemade conserves like these know that they beat the shop bought stuff by a mile – Ted

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Bohemian Livancy / Bøhmiske Livancy

A classic Central European recipe found in
“The Best of International Cooking” published by Hamlyn in 1984

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Livancy is a traditional pan fried cake originating from Central Europe and could be described as something in between the French crêpes and the American pancakes, except livancy are not as boring as the American pancakes and not as irritatingly posh as crêpes – they are just right.

For those who are not familiar with them, livancy are small, slightly sweetened spongy cakes which are usually served with sweet toppings. Although the recipe itself is very simple you can let your imagination run wild when it comes to these toppings. The traditional decorations are any kind of jam, whipped cream and fruit on top.

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The History of Jell-O

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Jell-O is a registered trademark of Kraft Foods for varieties of gelatin desserts, including fruit gels, puddings and no-bake cream pies.

Description

000_jell-o_07Jell-O is sold prepared (ready to eat) or in powder form, and is available in various colors and flavors. The powder contains powdered gelatin and flavorings, including sugar or artificial sweeteners. It is dissolved in hot water, then chilled and allowed to set. Fruit, vegetables, and whipped cream can be added to make elaborate snacks that can be molded into shapes. Jell-O must be put in a refrigerator until served, and once set, it can be eaten.

There are non-gelatin pudding and pie filling products sold under the Jell-O brand. Pudding is cooked on the stove top with milk, then eaten warm or chilled until firmly set. Jell-O has an instant pudding product which is mixed with cold milk and chilled. To make pie fillings, the same products are prepared with less liquid.

History

Early history

000_jell-o_09Gelatin, a protein produced from collagen extracted from boiled bones, connective tissues, and other animal products, has been a component of food, particularly desserts, since the 15th century.

Gelatin was popularized in the west in the Victorian era with spectacular and complex “jelly moulds”. Gelatin was sold in sheets and had to be purified, which was time-consuming. Gelatin desserts were the province of royalty and the relatively well-to-do. In 1845, a patent for powdered gelatin was obtained by industrialist Peter Cooper, who built the first American steam-powered locomotive, the Tom Thumb. This powdered gelatin was easy to manufacture and easier to use in cooking.

In 1897, in LeRoy, New York, carpenter and cough syrup manufacturer, Pearle Bixby Wait trademarked a gelatin dessert, called Jell-O. He and his wife May added strawberry, raspberry, orange and lemon flavoring to granulated gelatin and sugar. Then in 1899, Jell-O was sold to Orator Francis Woodward (1856–1906), whose Genesee Pure Food Company produced the successful Grain-O health drink. Part of the legal agreement between Woodward and Wait dealt with the similar Jell-O name.

Going mainstream

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Various elements were key to Jell-O becoming a mainstream product: new technologies, such as refrigeration, powdered gelatin and machine packaging, home economics classes, and the company’s marketing.

000_jell-o_12Initially Woodward struggled to sell the powdered product. Beginning in 1902, to raise awareness, Woodward’s Genesee Pure Food Company placed advertisements in the Ladies’ Home Journal proclaiming Jell-O to be “America’s Most Famous Dessert.” Jell-O was a minor success until 1904, when Genesee Pure Food Company sent armies of salesmen into the field to distribute free Jell-O cookbooks, a pioneering marketing tactic. Within a decade, three new flavors, chocolate (discontinued in 1927), cherry and peach, were added, and the brand was launched in Canada.[9] Celebrity testimonials and recipes appeared in advertisements featuring actress Ethel Barrymore and opera singer Ernestine Schumann-Heink. Some Jell-O illustrated advertisements were painted by Maxfield Parrish.

In 1923, the newly rechristened Jell-O Company launched D-Zerta, an artificially sweetened version of Jell-O. Two years later, Postum and Genesee merged, and in 1927 Postum acquired Clarence Birdseye’s frozen foods company to form the General Foods Corporation.

000_jell-o_11By 1930, there appeared a vogue in American cuisine for congealed salads, and the company introduced lime-flavored Jell-O to complement the add-ins that cooks across the country were combining in these aspics and salads. Popular Jell-O recipes often included ingredients like cabbage, celery, green peppers, and even cooked pasta.

By the 1950s, salads would become so popular that Jell-O responded with savory and vegetable flavors such as celery, Italian, mixed vegetable and seasoned tomato. These flavors have since been discontinued.

In 1934, sponsorship from Jell-O made comedian Jack Benny the dessert’s spokesperson. At this time Post introduced a jingle (“featured” by the agency Young & Rubicam) that would be familiar over several decades, in which the spelling “J-E-L-L-O” was (or could be) sung over a rising five-note musical theme. The jingle was written by Don Bestor, who was the bandleader for Jack Benny on his radio program.

In 1936, chocolate returned to the Jell-O lineup, as an instant pudding made with milk. It proved enormously popular, and over time other pudding flavors were added such as vanilla, tapioca, coconut, pistachio, butterscotch, egg custard, flan and rice pudding.

Baby boom

The baby boom saw a significant increase in sales for Jell-O. Young mothers didn’t have the supporting community structures of earlier generations, so marketers were quick to promote easy-to-prepare prepackaged foods. By this time, creating a Jell-O dessert required simply boiling water, Jell-O and Tupperware molds.

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New flavors were continually added and unsuccessful flavors were removed: in the 1950s and 1960s, apple, black cherry, black raspberry, grape, lemon-lime, mixed fruit, orange-banana, pineapple-grapefruit, blackberry, strawberry-banana, tropical fruit and more intense “wild” versions of the venerable strawberry, raspberry and cherry. In 1966, the Jell-O “No-Bake” dessert line was launched, which allowed a cheesecake to be made in 15 minutes. In 1969, Jell-O 1∗2∗3 (later Jell-O 1•2•3), a gelatin dessert that separated into three layers as it cooled, was unveiled. Until 1987, Jell-O 1•2•3 was readily found in grocery stores throughout most of the United States, but the dessert is now rare. In 1971 packaged prepared pudding called Jell-O Pudding Treats were introduced. Jell-O Whip ‘n Chill, a mousse-style dessert, was introduced and widely promoted; it remains available in limited areas today.

Sales decline and turnaround

000_jell-o_04In 1964, the slogan “There’s always room for Jell-O” was introduced, promoting the product as a “light dessert” that could easily be consumed even after a heavy meal.

Throughout the 1960s through the 1980s, Jell-O’s sales steadily decreased. Many Jell-O dishes, such as desserts and Jell-O salads, became special occasion foods rather than everyday items. Marketers blamed this decline on decreasing family sizes, a “fast-paced” lifestyle and women’s increasing employment. By 1986, a market study concluded that mothers with young children rarely purchased Jell-O.

To turn things around, Jell-O hired Dana Gioia to stop the decline. The marketing team revisited the Jell-O recipes published in past cookbooks and rediscovered Jigglers, although the original recipe did not use that name. Jigglers are Jell-O snacks molded into fun shapes and eaten as finger food. Jell-O launched a massive marketing campaign, notably featuring Bill Cosby as spokesman. The campaign was a huge success, causing a significant gain.

000_jell-o_02Cosby became the company’s pudding spokesperson in 1974, and continued as the voice of Jell-O for almost thirty years. Over his tenure as the mouthpiece for the company, he would help introduce new products such as frozen Jell-O Pops (in gelatin and pudding varieties); the new Sugar-Free Jell-O, which replaced D-Zerta in 1984 and was sweetened with NutraSweet; Jell-O Jigglers concentrated gummi snacks; and Sparkling Jell-O, a carbonated version of the dessert touted as the “Champagne of Jell-O.” In 2010, Cosby returned as Jell-O spokesperson in an on-line web series called “OBKB.”

In the 1980s, a Jell-O advertising campaign slogan reminded consumers, “Don’t forget—you have to remember to make it.”

000_jell-o_01In 1990, General Foods merged into Kraft Foods by parent company Philip Morris (now the Altria Group). New flavors were continually introduced: watermelon, blueberry, cranberry, margarita and piña colada among others. In 2001, the state Senate of Utah recognized Jell-O as a favorite snack food of Utah and the Governor Michael O. Leavitt declared an annual “Jell-O Week.” During the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, the souvenir pins included one depicting green Jell-O.

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, Jell-O’s family-friendly reputation was slightly tarnished by Jell-O shots and Jell-O wrestling.

As of 2008, there are more than 158 products sold under the Jell-O brand name with 300 million boxes of Jell-O gelatin sold in the United States each year.

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Jell-O is used as a substantial ingredient in a well-known dessert, a “Jell-O mold” the preparation of which requires a mold designed to hold gelatin, and the depositing of small quantities of chopped fruit, nuts, and other ingredients before it hardens to its typical form. Fresh pineapple, papaya, kiwi, and ginger root cannot be used because they contain enzymes that prevent gelatin from “setting”. In the case of pineapple juice and the enzyme bromelain that it contains though, the enzyme can be inactivated without denaturing through excessive heating and thus altering the flavor by the addition of a small measured amount of capsaicin sourced from hot chilies.

Almond Cake with Yeast / Mandelkake med Gjær

A cake recipe found in “Formkaker” (Mould Baked Cakes)
published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1981

mandelkake med gjær_post

Any cake baked in a mould, whether it is a square, oblong, round or ring mould, is called a “formkake” (mould cake) in Norway. And believe me, we do make a lot of them – Ted

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Marmalade – Facts and History

Marmalade Facts and History_aboutfoodThe name Marmalade comes from the Portuguese word Marmelos, a quince paste similar in texture to an orange spread popular long before the commercialisation of marmalade in the late 18th century.

Despite the belief that marmalade was ‘invented’ in Scotland by James Keiller and his wife it was not – though due thanks must go to the Keiller who are generally credited with making the delicious breakfast preserve commercially available. The romantic notion of James Keiller discovering a cargo of bitter oranges being sold cheaply which his wife then turned into jam has long been outed considering the existence of recipes for similar ‘jams’ dating back to the 1500s.

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According to food historian Ivan Day, one of the earliest known recipe for for a Marmelet of Oranges (close to what we know as marmalade today) comes from the recipe book of Eliza Cholmondeley around 1677.

Types of Orange Marmalade

Marmalade Facts and History3_aboutfoodThere are endless varieties of Marmalade and arguments abound at the breakfast table to personal preferences. Amongst the most popular are:

Thick Cut – the orange peel in the jelly is cut into thick chunks creating a tangy bitter flavor.
Thin Cut – the orange peel is shredded finely resulting in a softer flavor and texture.
Flavored – endless varieties with added flavors; whisky, Grand Marnier, ginger, or a mixture of citrus fruits.
Vintage – marmalade left to mature for a denser, richer flavor.
Black – made by the adding of brown sugar or black molasses.

Making Marmalade

The bitter oranges needed for making true marmalade are only available in late-winter to early spring. Seville orange pulp is also available year-round in cans which it does make a good marmalade, though frowned on by purists.

Text from about.com/food

 Read more here: A Comprehensive History of Marmalade from the World Marmalade Awards.

Good Neighbour Brunch / Brunch med Gode Naboer

A menu suggestion and a recipe from an ad for
French’s Mustard published in LIFE magazine in 1957

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King-of-the-Castle Custards / Kongen-på-Haugen Vaniljepudding

A Recipe from an ad for Bird’s Custard published im 19521952_birds custard_post

I’ve been  great fan of Bird’s Custard ever since I was a young man. I never leave Britain without at least 4 or 5 tins in my luggage – Ted

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Rich Knights / Rike Riddere

A traditional re-vamped  Norwegian dessert found on matprat.no503_Rike Riddere_post

What English speaking people call French Toast is called “Arme Riddere” in Norway, and ‘arme riddere’ means ‘poor knights’. ‘Rich knights’ is a luxurious version of the dish made from sponge pieces, which is softened in milk with vanilla and spices, then fried in a skillet or pan. ‘Rich Knights’ are served with red currant jelly, whipped cream, chopped pistachio nuts and fresh red currents.

000_recipe_eng_flagg Recipe in English  000_recipe_nor_flagg Oppskrift på norsk

Recipe posted at:
Tickle My Tastebuds Tuesday[4]TuesdaysTable copyTreasure Box Tuesday[4]

Party Cake With Biscuits / Festkake Med Kjeks

A no baking cake found on “Kaker Til kaffen”
(Cakes For The Coffee)
Published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1979
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A great no baking party cake that you prepare a day in advance and just garnish before the guests arrive.

000_recipe_eng_flagg Recipe in English  000_recipe_nor_flagg Oppskrift på norsk

Recipe posted at:
Tickle My Tastebuds TuesdayTuesdaysTable copyTreasure Box Tuesday