Classic Norwegian Fish Gratin / Klassisk Fiskegrateng

A classic Norwegian fish dish found in “Fisk og Skalldyr”
(Fish and Shelfish ) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980

Classic Norwegian Fish Gratin / Klassisk Fiskegrateng

Fish gratin is a classic Norwegian dinner dish. It’s a simple, fast and child-friendly way to cook fish. It has always been one of my favorites, whether made with potatoes, macaroni or shellfish like here.

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Thick Danish Farmhouse Soup / Tykk Dansk Bondesuppe

A soup recipe from “Mine 100 Bedste Opskrifter Fra Fad
Og Fryser” (My 100 Best Recipes from Pots and Freezer) by Mona Giersing published by Lademann in 1982Thick Danish Farmhouse Soup / Tykk Dansk Bondesuppe

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Cheese Cream / Ostekrem

A cheese recipe found in “Ost i Varme og Kalde Retter”
(Cheese in Hot and Cold Dishes) published by
Den Norske Bokklubben in 1988

Cheese Cream / Ostekrem

This piquant cheese cream works very well as a completion of a meal.

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Graham Rolls with Cheese / Grahamrundstykker med Ost

A baking recipe from “Norsk Ukeblads Store Bakebok”
(Norsk Ukeblad’s Big Baking Book ) published in 1982

Graham Rolls with Cheese / Grahamrundstykker med Ost

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Mueller’s Macaroni Cheese Bake / Mueller’s Ovnsbakte Makaroni og Ost

A classic American recipe found in “Delicious Recipes
with Mueller’s Macaroni Products” published
by C F Mueller Co in the 1940sMueller’s Macaroni Cheese Bake / Mueller’s Ovnsbakte Makaroni og Ost

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Cheese Buns / Osteboller

A delicious cheesy bun recipe found on godt.no
Cheese Buns / Osteboller

These cheese buns are made with three types of cheese: they are filled with a nice piece of mozzarella and then sprinkled with grated cheddar and parmesan. The great flavor also comes from the fact that the dough for the cheese buns contains both butter, olive oil, salt and garlic powder. In addition, the buns should be brushed with a mixture of melted butter, garlic powder and fresh oregano after baking.

Mmm-m-m, as you see, these buns are flavourful stuff, the taste is amazing! Serve the cheese buns while they are still hot and fresh, with the cheese inside still soft and delicious.

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The History of Jarlsberg Cheese

The History of Jarlsberg CheeseJarlsberg (Norwegian pronunciation: [²jɑːɭsbærɡ];English: /ˈjɑːrlzbɜːrɡ/ ) is a mild cow’s-milk cheese with large regular holes, that originates from Jarlsberg, Norway. Although it originated in Norway, it is also produced in Ohio and Ireland under licenses from Norwegian dairy producers.

Description

The History of Jarlsberg CheeseJarlsberg cheese has a yellow wax rind (outer layer) and a semi-firm yellow interior. It is a mild, buttery cheese. The flavor has been described as “clean and rich, with a slightly sweet and nutty flavour”. It is an all-purpose cheese, used for both cooking and eating as a snack. It has a characteristic smooth, shiny-yellow body, and a creamy supple texture. It is aged a minimum of one year and is distinguished by medium to large holes. It is usually produced in 10 kg wheels with an approximate diameter of 330 mm and a height of 95-105 mm. The characteristic holes or “eyes” are the result of the action of the bacteria Propionibacterium freudenreichii which naturally occurs in milk and is added back to the cheese during production according to a closely guarded secret formula.

History

The history of this cheese can be traced back to the middle 1850s. Anders Larsen Bakke (1815–1899), a farmer and pioneer in Norway’s dairy industry, produced cheese in the village of Våle in what was then the county of Jarlsberg and Larviks Amt (now Vestfold), 80 km (50 mi) south of Oslo. The cheese shares similarities with Emmental, introduced to Vestfold by Swiss cheese makers during the 1830s. The cheese was first noted in the annual county report of Jarlsberg and Larviks Amt in 1855. After several years of popularity marked by a large volume of production Jarlsberg disappeared from the market.

The History of Jarlsberg Cheese

Modern Jarlsberg cheese was developed in 1956 by Ole Martin Ystgaard of the Dairy Institute at the Agricultural University of Norway. Ystgaard’s interest was sparked by the thesis of a dairy sciences student, Per Sakshaug, on the cheese historically made in Vestfold. It was named for a Norwegian nobleman Count Wedel Jarlsberg (or the eponymous county) who owned land near Oslo in an area where an earlier version of the cheese was produced in the early 1800s. The recipe was developed from formulae originating with Swiss cheesemakers who moved to Norway in that time.

Text from Wikipedia

Pabst-ett Deviled Eggs / Pabst-ett Fylte Egg

A starter recipe from “Recipes the Modern Pabst-ett Way”
published by Pabst Corporation in 1931

Pabst-ett Deviled Eggs / Pabst-ett Fylte Egg

Pabst-ett was a cheese prodused by Pabst brewery during Prohibition. Many breweries turned to alternative pruducts back then.  After Prohibition ended in 1933, Pabst sold the cheese business off to Kraft who continued to produce Pabst-ett cheese until at least the late 1940’s. If you want to try your hand at this recipe, use any cheese to your taste you think might go well with the rest of the recipe ingredients.

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Fish Gratin / Fiskegrateng

A dinner recipe from “Fisk og Skalldyr” (Fish and Shellfish)
published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980

Fish Gratin / Fiskegrateng

This dish has always been popular in Norway and it still is. You will find several versions of it in the freezers at any grocers all over the country. Nice enough of course, but nothing compared with your own home cooked – Ted

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Fresh Cheese / Ferskost

A recipe for fresh cheese found on norsktradisjonsmat.no
Fresh Cheese / Ferskost

An old recipe from Toten. This recipe is taken from the book “Amtmanninen og hennes døtre” (The country governor’s wife and her daughters), written by Torveig Dahl, Kirsten Gustad, Anne Mari Amlien, Vigdis Bjørhovde, Rita Wentzel-Larsen and Karin E. Jansen.

The book is based on the handwritten recipe from Ditlevine Weidemann and her daughters Ingeborg Marie, Nahyda and Amalie from Stenberg at Toten, where they lived from 1802 to 1901.

The country governor’s wife kept track of large and comprehensive households, and was responsible for ensuring that what was served for both everyday and parties was state-of-the-art and contentive for the family, for the staff – and for all the guests throughout the year.

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White Mini Pizzas with Jarlsberg Cheese / Hvite Minipizzaer med Jarlsberg

A mini pizza recipe found in “10 inspirerende oppskrifter
med Jarlsberg” (10 inspiring recipes with Jarlsberg)
a free booklet published by
 Tine

White Mini Pizzas with Jarlsberg Cheese / Hvite Minipizzaer med Jarlsberg

White mini pizzas with crème fraiche, Serrano ham, pear and thyme.

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Savory Eggs / Velsmakende Egg

A breakfast recipe found in “Recipes the Modern Pabst-ett Way”
published by the Pabst Cooporation in 1931

Savory Eggs / Velsmakende Egg

Pabst-ett was a cheese prodused by Pabst brewery during Prohibition. After Prohibition ended in 1933, Pabst sold the cheese business off to Kraft who continued to produce Pabst-ett cheese until at least the late 1940’s. If you want to try your hand at this recipe, use any cheese to your taste you think might go well the rest of the recipe ingredients.

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Macaroni and Cheese / Makaroni og Ost

One of Elvis Presley’s favourite dishes found in
“Are you hungry tonight” published in 1992
Macaroni and Cheese / Makaroni og Ost

Elvis ate macaroni and cheese at home whenever possible. He
loved it homemade, thick, gooey, and made with American cheese.

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Tudor Vegetable Pie / Grønnsakspai fra Tudortiden

A meatless pie recipe from the Tudor era
found at historyextra.com

 Tudor Vegetable Pie / Grønnsakspai fra Tudortiden

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, a vegetable pie from the Tudor era.

Sam writes: This 1596 recipe for a “pie of bald meats [greens] for fish days” was handy for times such as Lent or Fridays when the church forbade the eating of meat (another similar recipe is called simply Friday Pie). Medieval pastry was a disposable cooking vessel, but in the 1580s there were great advancements in pastry work. Pies became popular, with many pastry types, shapes and patterns filled with everything from lobster to strawberries. This pie’s sweet/savoury combo is typical of Tudor cookery. I enjoyed it, but was glad I’d reduced the sugar content.

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Cheese Straws / Ostestenger

A snacks recipe found in “Good Luck Recipes”
published by John F Jelke Co in 1916

Cheese Straws / Ostestenger
Cheese straws seems to be a snack enjoyed for quite some time already to judge by this recipe from way back in 1916.

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