High-Protein Dinner in a Salad Bowl / En høyproteinmiddag i en Salatbolle

A salad dinner recipe from an ad published in
LIFE magazine June 23 1961
High-Protein Dinner in a Salad Bowl / En høyproteinmiddag i en Salatbolle

Star-Kist Tuna advertised heavily in LIFE magazine all through the 1960s. Here’s a post based on one of these ads – Ted

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Cheese Gratinated Vegetables / Ostegratinerte Grønnsaker

A classic side dish found in “Varme Småretter” (Small Hot
Dishes) in the  “Ingrids Beste” (Ingrid’s Best) series
publishd by Gyldendal i 1991

Cheese Gratinated Vegetables / Ostegratinerte Grønnsaker

If you think it’s a lot of work to first cook the vegetables and then gratinate them afterwards, you can use deep-frozen vegetables as a starting point.

Deep frozen broccoli or a blend of summer vegetables are excellent. Put the vegetables deep frozen in the mould and pour the sauce over them. Calculate 4-5 minutes longer in the oven for the frozen ones.

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Steaks with Brie / Biff med Brie

En fancy lunch recipe found in “Minikokeboken – Storfekjøtt Klassisk og Moderne” (The Mini Cook Book – Beef Classic and Modern) published by the Norwegian Information Office for MeatSteaks with Brie / Biff med Brie

Beef can be so much more than just a steak. Try a new twist! Roasted pine nuts, semi-melted brie and red currant jelly give this dish a mild and aromatic taste.

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Tartelettes au Fromage – Small Cheese Tarts / Små Osteterter

A starter recipe found in “Fransk Bondekost”
(French Farmhouse Cooking) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980

Tartelettes au Fromage – Small Cheese Tarts / Små Osteterter

It is not correct to use the term “cousine” of French farmhouse cooking. It is more a natural part of life. There is no Machiavellian refinements or superfluous embellishments. Wholesome, tasty, simple ingredients in dishes to suit season, climate and workload.

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Piquant Straws / Pikante Strå

A snacks recipe found in “Ost i Varme og Kalde Retter”
(Cheese in Hot and Cold Dishes) published by
Den Norske Bokklubb in 1988
Piquant Straws / Pikante Strå

Every grocers has shelf after chelf with salt snacks these days so it is
so easy to grab a box or bag, but why not try this recipe for these
spicy snack straws instead the next time the snacks hunger hits you

Ted
Winking smile

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Lunch Rolls with Cheese / Lunch Rundstykker med Ost

A baking recipe found in “Den Store Bakeboken”
(The Big Baking Book) published by Schibstedt i 1978

Lunch Rolls with Cheese / Lunch Rundstykker med Ost

Norwegians seldom eat hot lunches, so fresh bread or rolls is important stuff here round that time of the day whether we’ve packed our lunch before leaving home or buy sandwhiches at a bakers or in the cafeteria at work. Special bread or rolls like these are popular here both home baked and bought.

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Tomato-Cheese Toast / Tomat- og Ostetoast

A snack recipe found in “New Fashion Plates for Your Menu”
published by Planters Edible Oil Co in 1932
Tomato-Cheese Toast / Tomat- og Ostetoast

Cheese sandwiches is a snack dish that never seems to go out of style.
I’ve found recipes for such from every decade through out the last
century and both decades in this. Cheese sandwiches really
deserves to be called a classic – Ted

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Italian Sausage Mould / Italiensk Pølseform

A recipe from the free booklet “Mini Kokebok – Pølser”
(Mini Cook Book – Sausages) published by the
Norwegian Meat Information Office

Italian Sausage Mould / Italiensk Pølseform

It’s a myth that dishes baked in the oven are harder to cook than other dishes. The fact is that once you have completed the preparation, the dish makes itself. Sausages also have the advantage that they are quickly done. As you see, you have good reasons and try cooking sausages this way.

A cookbook featuring nothing but sausage recipes is the most natural
thing here in Norway, we eat the stuff like we’re afraid they’ll all
mysteriously disappear from the shop shelves over night

Ted
Winking smile

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The History of Fondue

An article by Peggy Trowbridge Filippone posted on The Spruce

The History of Fondue

From the Swiss Alps to American suburbs, fondue proves
it’s always hip to dip

Fondue headlined suburban American theme parties in the 1960s, then pretty quickly fell out of favor, as fads so often do. Americans briefly rediscovered the communal meal in the early ’90s, albeit with a more modern and health-conscious approach to the recipes. But if everything old eventually becomes new again, that fondue pot set you stashed in the basement might be due to come out for another round.

Fondue Origin

The idea of fondue likely calls to mind the style that originated during the 1800s in the Swiss Alps as a way to use hardened cheese and stale bread during the winter months. Deriving from the French verb fondre, meaning “to melt,” fondue was a classic peasant dish made fashionable across the country after World War I by the Swiss Cheese Union. French gastronome Brillat-Savarin mentioned fondue in his 19th-century writings.

The History of FondueBut fondue-like dishes originated in cultures around the world, such as Asian hot pots in which diners cook chunks of meat, seafood or vegetables in a communal pot of bubbling oil or steaming broth. Mexico’s queso fundido resembles the cheesy Swiss dish, though served with tortillas, while bagna cauda in Italy relies on pureed anchovies for texture and flavor and is typically accompanied by vegetables. Chef Konrad Egli of New York’s Chalet Suisse Restaurant gets the credit for chocolate fondue, which he developed in 1964 to support a marketing effort by Swiss company Toblerone.

The History of Fondue

Fondue Today

Traditional Swiss fondue combines Emmentaler and/or Gruyere cheese and wine, melted in a communal pot. A cherry brandy called The History of Fonduekirsch gets added to the mixture, which becomes a dip for pieces of stale bread and crusts. In Switzerland, cooks in different regions produce fondue with other local melting cheeses and variations on flavorings.

But they all agree that the best bite develops at the bottom of the pot during the course of the meal. The crusty slab of cheese, called le religieuse, gets reverentially scrapped off by fondue connoisseurs and shared around the table.

Those same connoisseurs (and hopefully any good cheese fondue host) will tell you to drink white wine, kirsch or herbal tea with your meal — and nothing else. Those in the know say beer or juice or even water can cause the cheese in your belly to coagulate, which doesn’t sound like a pleasant end to the meal.

Chocolate fondue might seem like a foregone conclusion, but the editors at Bon Appetit don’t recommend the high-cholesterol combination.  A few slices of fresh pineapple make a much better choice for dessert because the natural enzymes help with digestion.

The History of Fondue

You don’t even need a special fondue pot to serve a meal for family or friends. A slow cooker makes a convenient substitute and keeps the cheese warm. You can also melt the cheese in a double boiler on an electric hot plate, or prepare it on the stove and transfer it to a chaffing dish.

Yogurt Cheese Balls Marinated in Herbs / Yoghurtostkuler Marinert i Urter

A home made cheese recipe found in
“Harrods Cookery Book” published in 1985
Yogurt Cheese Balls Marinated in Herbs / Yoghurtostkuler Marinert i Urter

These walnut-sized balls of thick yogurt look very pretty in their jar of
golden olive oil. Eat with salads, using the flavored oil as a salad dressing.

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Orange and Lemon Cream / Appelsin- og Sitron Krem

A dessert recipe found in “Ost i Varme og Kalde Retter”
(Cheese in Hot and Cold Dishes) published by
Den Norske Bokklubben i 1988
Orange and Lemon Cream / Appelsin- og Sitron Krem

Just by looking at the list of ingredients you know that this dessert
is going to taste absolutely delicious – Ted

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Bacon Cheddar Potato Skins / Bacon & Cheddar Potetskall

A simple and quick snack recipe found on countryliving.com
Bacon Cheddar Potato Skins / Bacon & Cheddar Potetskall

A pretty nifty way to serve potatoes if you ask me. Remove most of the potato stuff and fill them with bacon and cheese, bake them crispy in the campfire ambres and top it with spring onion and sour cream – Ted

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Soup with Shrimp, Corn and Cheese / Suppe Med Reker, Mais og Ost

A recipe found in “Ost i Varme og Kalde Retter” (Cheese in Hot and Cold Dishs) published by Den Norske Bokklubb in 1988
Soup with Shrimp, Corn and Cheese / Suppe Med Reker, Mais og Ost

This is a heavy soup that can be served as a full meal
with butter and rolls.

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Corn Pie / Maispai

A tasty pie recipe found in “Ost i Varme og Kalde Retter”
(Cheese in Hot and Cold Dishes) published by
Den Norske Bokklubb in 1988
Corn Pie / Maispai

A pie with an American touch since corn is not the most common ingredient in pies here in Scandinavia.

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Cheese Pie With Bacon / Ostepai Med Bacon

A pie recipe found in “Best Casseroles to Make”
published by Woman’s Day in 1973

Cheese Pie With Bacon / Ostepai Med Bacon

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