Saté Pentul – Indonesian Minced Pork Saté / Indonesisk Saté av Malt Svinekjøtt

An Asian specuality found in “Robert Carrier’s Kitchen
Cook Book” published in 1980

Saté Pentul – Indonesian Minced Pork Saté / Indonesisk Saté av Malt Svinekjøtt

This recipe comes from Bali, though there are variations of it on nearby islands. On Lombok, for example, they make it with beef. The minced meatballs may split when you push them on to the bamboo skewers unless you take the precautions described in the recipe. You can prepare this saté and refrigerate it for up to 24 hours before cooking.

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Medieval Monday – Doucetes

A pie recipe from the fifitenth century found on Let Hem Boyle
Medieval Monday – Doucetes

Original recipe

Take Cream a good cupful & put it in a strainer; then take yolks of Eggs & put thereto, & a little milk; then strain it through a strainer into a bowl; then take Sugar enough & put thereto, or else honey for default of Sugar, then color it with Saffron; then take thine coffins & put in the oven empty & and let them be hardened; then take a dish fastened on the Baker’s peel’s end; & pour thine mixture into the dish & from the dish into the coffins & when they do rise well, take them out & serve them forth.

Take a thousand eggs or more, I Volume,
Harleian MS. 279, c. 1420

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15th Century Tarte Owt of Lente / 1500talls Terte Upassende for Fasten

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Queen’s Gingerbread / Dronningens Krydderkake

A recipe from medieval times found on theguardian.comQueen's gingerbread_post

A dark, highly spiced slab gingerbread (what the Elizabethans would have called a sweetmeat) that’s rather firm like panforte, and ever so good cut into small diamonds to serve with brandy after dinner.

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Medieval Monday – Buttered Beere

A recipe for a real cockles warmer found on historyextra.com
Medieval Monday_headingButtered beere_post

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings a recipe from the past. In this article, Sam recreates buttered beere – a sweet, slightly alcoholic drink that warmed the cockles in Tudor times.

This is an authentic Tudor recipe from 1588, taken from “The Good Huswifes Handmaide for the Kitchin”. It’s similar to a caudle, a drink of warm wine or ale with sugar, eggs and spices, renowned for its medicinal properties and popular at the same period.

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