Chocolate-Amaretto Ice Cream / Sjokolade og Amaretto Iskrem

A great dessert recipe found in “Hershey’s Make it Chocolate!” published by Hershey in 1987Chocolate-Amaretto Ice Cream / Sjokolade og Amaretto Iskrem

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge dessert_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Amaretto (Italian for “a little bitter”) is a sweet, almond-flavoured, Italian liqueur associated with Saronno, Italy. Various commercial brands are made from a base of apricot pits, almonds, or both.

Amaretto serves a variety of culinary uses, can be drunk by itself, and is added to other beverages to create several popular mixed drinks, as well as to coffee and ice cream.

Chocolate Sponge anno 1927 / Sjokoladepudding anno 1927

A classic chocolate dessert found in “Knox Gelatine – Dainty Desserts  – Candies – Salads” published in 1927
Chocolate Sponge_post

I mentioned in the previous post that I loved thin pancakes, but to be honest, I’m sort of a all round dessert kind of guy. So you might already have guessed, I love chocolate desserts too

Ted
Winking smile

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge dessert_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

A Cup of Hot Chocolate, S’Good for What Ails Ya

An article by Mary Miley Theobald at history.orgA Cup of Hot Chocolate, S’Good for What Ails Ya

Some historians think that chocolate drinking spread from England to its North American colonies, but it seems more likely that it came directly in ships that plied the trade routes from the West Indies to the major colonial ports of Boston, Philadelphia, New York, and Newport, Rhode Island. Whatever the route, chocolate arrived in English North America at about the same time it arrived in England. It was available as chocolate nuts, as shells, and in processed “chocolate cakes,” lumps of grated powder and sugar ready to be stirred into boiling water, mixed with whatever ingredients one preferred, and frothed with the little hand mill.

A Cup of Hot Chocolate, S’Good for What Ails Ya

Those who bought the cacao seed had to roast and grind the chocolate themselves or, more likely, have their servants or slaves do the tedious job. Those who, like Martha Washington, purchased the cacao shells, steeped them in hot water to make a thin chocolaty drink that was easier on the stomach than oily chocolate.

According to Jim Gay, most chocolate was processed in the northern colonies, in New England, Philadelphia, and New York. It was sold in its various forms in general stores and grocers’ shops. In pre-Revolutionary Williamsburg, unsweetened chocolate went for about two shillings sixpence per pound, slightly more than a free unskilled laborer or sailor earned in a day. Obviously, few of those men drank chocolate. Prices fell, however, and by the nineteenth century, it had become cheap enough to be given to slaves.

A Cup of Hot Chocolate, S’Good for What Ails Ya
Nobilities drinking chocolate in Mrs White’s Chocolate House in London.

Its perceived medicinal value made chocolate a natural product for apothecary shops. It was considered nourishing for the sick as well as an aid to digestion and was believed to promote longevity, help lung ailments, energize the body, cure hangovers, suppress coughs, and, as mentioned, stimulate the libido. For that reason, the Virginia A Cup of Hot Chocolate, S’Good for What Ails YaAlmanac of 1770 cautioned women against it, warning “the fair sex to be in a particular manner careful how they meddle with romances, chocolate, novels, and the like,” especially in the spring, as those were all “inflamers” and “very dangerous.”

“This was very much ignored,” Jim Gay says. “Women were the main consumers of chocolate. Children were denied chocolate because it was a stimulant.” But it was this sexy reputation that caused chocolate to become associated with love, Valentine’s Day, sinful pleasures, and decadence.

Ben Franklin recommended chocolate as a cure for smallpox in Poor Richard’s Almanac of 1761; Doctor Benjamin Rush did the same in his A Cup of Hot Chocolate, S’Good for What Ails Yamedical texts. Thomas Jefferson thought chocolate would overtake tea and coffee as the American beverage of choice. In a letter of November 27, 1785, to John Adams he wrote, “The superiority of chocolate, both for health and nourishment, will soon give it the preference over tea and coffee in America which it has in Spain.” In this he was mistaken. Chocolate drinking would soon decline in favor of chocolate eating.

By the late eighteenth century, a very few, very wealthy Americans were eating chocolate as food. Not the creamy sort of milk chocolate candy bars we know today—those would not exist until the nineteenth century—this rather gritty chocolate was shaved and cooked into puddings, pies, and tarts and served as a side dish at dinner. It was also mixed into creams and ice creams and almond-shaped candies and served at the finest tables as part of the dessert course.

A Cup of Hot Chocolate, S’Good for What Ails Ya

North America’s first cookbook, printed in 1742 in Williamsburg by William Parks, publisher of the Virginia Gazette, contained but one chocolate recipe: “chocolate almonds.” The list of ingredients included A Cup of Hot Chocolate, S’Good for What Ails Yano almonds; the word merely reflected the shape of the chocolate, which was mixed with sugar, orange flower water, and a binder. Today we might call it a chocolate drop.

Gay’s research turned up other Virginia chocolate recipes in manuscript form, sometimes written by an unknown housewife. One of these mixes sugar, chocolate, and almonds, then directs the cook to use cochineal to color them red, saffron for yellow, “Stone blew” for blue, and “the Juice of Spinage” for green. Gay calls this “the eighteenth-century ancestor of M&Ms.”

A Cup of Hot Chocolate, S’Good for What Ails YaChocolate did not really become a food until the middle of the nineteenth century. The pivotal date was 1828, when a Dutchman, Casparus Van Houten, invented a machine for manufacturing powdered low-fat cocoa. Chocolate beverages became easier and cheaper to make, leading to what some have called the democratization of chocolate.

A Cup of Hot Chocolate, S’Good for What Ails Ya

In 1847, an English chocolate maker that had been in business almost a hundred years, J. S. Fry and Sons, developed the first molded chocolate bar. A Swiss, Henri Nestlé, figured out in 1867 how to make powdered milk by evaporation, and another Swiss, Daniel Peter, came up with the idea of blending Nestlé’s powdered milk with chocolate in 1879. The milk chocolate candy bar was on its way.

4 Classic Cakes From The Thirties / 4 Klassiske Kaker Fra Tredvetallet

4 cake recipes found in “Moderne Baking” (Modern Baking)
published by Freia as in 1938 to promote their baking powder

4 Classic Cakes From The Thirties / 4 Klassiske Kaker Fra Tredvetallet

Baking is strange, our breakfast, lunch and dinner habits and menus change a lot from decade to decade, but our favourite cakes recipes hardly ever change. “Moderne Baking” was published 80 years ago and still you could find these four recipes in one version or other in just about any contemporary baking cook book.

Its nice to know there are still some constants in our lives in these times of rapid changes – Ted

Winking smile

000_england_recipe_marker_ny000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Drømmegod Rullekake / Dreamlike Roly Poly

A delicious Swiss roll recipe found on alleoppskrifter.no
Drømmegod Rullekake / Dreamlike Roly Poly

Jelly Roll, Swiss Roll or Roly Poly is an old English recipe. The earliest published reference for a rolled cake spread with jelly was in the Northern Farmer, a journal published in Utica, New York, in December 1852. Called “To Make Jelly Cake”, the recipe describes a modern “jelly roll” and reads: “Bake quick and while hot spread with jelly. Roll carefully, and wrap it in a cloth. When cold cut in slices for the table.”

The terminology evolved in America for many years. From 1852 to 1877 such a dessert was called: Jelly Cake (1852), Roll Jelly Cake (1860), Swiss Roll (1872), Jelly Roll (1873), and Rolled Jelly Cake (1876). The name “Jelly Roll” was eventually adopted.

The origin of the term “Swiss roll” is unknown. The earliest British reference to a rolled cake by that name appeared on a bill of fare dated 18 June 1871, published in the 1872 book A Voyage from Southampton to Cape Town, in the Union Company’s Mail Steamer “Syria” (London). A recipe for “Swiss roll” also appeared in the U.S. that same year in The American Home Cook Book, published in Detroit, Michigan, in 1872.

Several 1880s to 1890s cookbooks from London, England, used the name Swiss roll exclusively.

The American Pastry Cook, published in Chicago in 1894, presented a basic “Jelly Roll Mixture” then listed variants made from it that included a Swiss roll, Venice roll, Paris roll, chocolate roll, jelly roll cotelettes, and decorated jelly rolls.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge baking_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Sherry Waffles / Sherryvafler

A filled cookie recipe found in “Det Nye Kjøkkenbiblioteket”
(The New Kitchen Library) published in 1971

Sherry Waffles / Sherryvafler

From the recipe text: It can not be repeated too often that you are fairly well covered for surprises in the form of suddenly arriving guests if you in the cookie jar have finished baked cookies that just need a quick whipped cream or the like to make you able to serve something really nice – such as some sherry waffles.

As you can see from the text above, Scandinavian housewive’s greatest fear back in the late sixties and early seventies was to be caught red handed by unannounced guests without some tempting goodies to serve with the coffee. Life was hard back then I can tell you, I was there – Ted 😉

000_england_recipe_marker_nyill_022000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Confectionery Squares / Konfektbiter

A delicious chewy chocolate cake recipe  from “Sjokolade”  (Chocolate) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1984
Confectionery Squares / Konfektbiter000_england_recipe_marker_nyill_094000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Italian Torrone / Italiensk Torrone

An Italian speciality found in “European Favourites”
by Carol Wright published by Collins in 1973

Italian Torrone / Italiensk Torrone

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge ethnic speciality_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Old Fashioned Marble Cake / Gammeldags Marmorkake

A classic baking recipe found in “Formkaker” (Mould Baked Cakes) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1981 
Old Fashioned Marble Cake / Gammeldags Marmorkake

Old fashioned marble cake – a favorite back in  grandmother’s days, and just as popular today.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge baking_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Mocha Crêpes with Pears / Mokka Crêpes med Pærer

A fancy dessert recipe found in “Robert Carrier’s Kitchen
Cook Book” published in 1980
mocha crêpes with pears_post

Robert Carrier McMahon, OBE (Tarrytown, New York, November 10, 1923 – France, June 27, 2006), usually known as Robert Carrier, was an American chef, restaurateur and cookery writer. His success came in England, where he was based from 1953 to 1984, and then from 1994 until his death.

000_england_recipe_marker_ny000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Chocolate Custard / Vaniljesaus med Sjokoladesmak

A custard recipe found in “32 Entirely New & Original Lutona Cocoa Recipes” published by E & S Jt C.W.S Ltd in the 1930s.
chocolate custard_post

Text from the booklet: Everyone knows that the most nourishing, most sustaining and appetising hot beverage in the world is Cocoa.

Everyone knows it as a beverage that may be freely partaken of at any time of the day by children and adults alike, without fear of indigestion or ill effects.

But the Cocoa you drink must be the best. and there is no finer Cocoa in all the world than Lutona.

Lutona is made from the choicest varieties of cocoas grown under ideal conditions and matured in Society’s own Depots in West Africa.

Every phase of its manufacture is under the direct control of the Society and the most rigid precautions are taken to ensure that the natural purity and full food value of the cocoa are retained.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge beverage2000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Chocolate Pancakes / Sjokoladepannekaker

A recipe from “32 Entirely New & Original Lutona Cocoa Recipes” published by E & S Jt. C.W.S Ltd. in the 1930s
chocolate pancakes_post

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge dessert_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

In Context: The English and the Scottish CWS opened a cocoa factory in Dallow Road, Luton, in 1902. Like the British Empire it is gone now, demolished early in 1970. It is now a site of the Guardian Business Park, near the junction with Vernon Road. This poster dates from 1906 and is a contrast between an idealised view of work in West Africa and the impressive building with smoking chimney to demonstarte a hive of industry in Luton.

luton cocoa 1906

Nowadays the cocoa and chocolate is advertised as a Fairtrade product, the workers in West Africa have their own co-operative, but no sign of any factories in the UK, or wherever it is processed in the EU.

Here’s How to Cool off With Coffee

Recipes from an coffee ad published by
The Pan-American Coffee Bureau in 1956

1956_Pan-American coffee Bureau_post

The Pan-American Coffee Bureau kindly brings you advice on both how to brew your ice coffee and how to enjoy it.

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor

French Chocolate + 2 more / Fransk Sjokolade + 2 til

3 recipes from  “Best Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes”
published by Walter Baker & Company in 1931

1931 Walter Baker & Company - Best Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes_post

Text from the booklet:

Beverages – Steaming or Frosted –
Cocoa … The Food Drink

A fragrant cup of Baker’s Cocoa, beaded with creamy bubbles, is one of the most beneficial food drinks for both children and adults. Made with a generous supply of milk, it contains the vital food elements in admirably balanced proportion . . . elements necessary for buoyant health and robust bodies.

There is also glowing warmth for frosty mornings … sustaining energy for those in-between hours after school . . . and soothing nourishment at nightfall for tired minds and bodies.

Foamy, creamy-rich cocoa is a wonderful food with which to woo finicky child-appetites – an easy and delicious way of helping to include the daily quart of milk in their meals. Grown-ups welcome cocoa, too, as a way of building up run-down systems. And in this day of slimmer waists, cocoa is popular because it provides nourishment that is satisfying but not fattening.

000_recipe_engill_136000_recipe_nor

Camilla’s Sunday Cake / Camillas Søndagskake

A flashback from the sixties found in ”Husmorens Store Kokebok” (The Housewife’s Big Cook Book) published in 1963
camillas søndagskake_post

Everything about this picture reminds me of my childhood. The fancy way of decorating the cake and the flowery tea cups are so very typical of a Norwegian coffee table  back in the sixties. I still got several sets of tea crockery just like the one you see above. I’m a bit weird, I know – Ted 😉

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor