Duchess Potatoes / Duchessepoteter

A great way to serve potatoes found on frukt.no
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Duchess Potatoes are mashed potatoes with added egg yolks, shaped with piping bag or knife and then roasted in the oven. A decorative new twist to your dinner.

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French Ham Plate / Fransk Skinketallerken

A Continental lunch plate recipe found in “Norsk Ukeblads
Store Salatbok” (The Norwegian Weekly Family Magazine’s
Large Salad Book) published in 1984

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Medieval Monday – Tharida

A  medieval lent recipe found on The Medieval Vegan
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The guy who runs The Medieval Vegan writes: Lent is a great opportunity for the The Medieval Vegan since it was a time of fasting and so the foods eaten are a lot closer to what I’ve been cooking. Of course the medieval Christian would still count fish (and sometimes any meat that they made to look like fish) but even so there are a number of recipes that are truly vegan.

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Serviche of Scallop with Herbs / Serviche av Kamskjell med Urter

A starter recipe found in “Alt Om Urter” (All About Herbs)
published by Ekstrabokklubben in 1985

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Scallop (/ˈskɒləp/ or /ˈskæləp/) is a common name that is primarily applied to any one of numerous species of saltwater clams or marine bivalve mollusks in the taxonomic family Pectinidae, the scallops. However, the common name “scallop” is also sometimes applied to species in other closely related families within the superfamily Pectinoidea.

ill_01Scallops are a cosmopolitan family of bivalves, found in all of the world’s oceans, though never in freshwater. They are one of very few groups of bivalves to be primarily “free-living”; many species are capable of rapidly swimming short distances and even of migrating some distance across the ocean floor. A small minority of scallop species live cemented to rocky substrates as adults, while others are more simply attached by means of a filament they secrete called a byssal thread. The majority of species, however, live recumbent on sandy substrates, and when they sense the presence of a predator such as a starfish, they are able to escape by swimming swiftly but erratically through the water using a form of jet propulsion created by repeatedly clapping their shells together. Scallops have a well-developed nervous system, and unlike most other bivalves they have numerous simple eyes situated around the edge of their mantles.

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Many species of scallops are highly prized as a food source, and some are farmed as aquaculture. The word “scallop” is also applied to the meat of these bivalves when it is sold as seafood. In addition the name “scallop” is used as part of the name of dishes based on the meat of scallops, and is even applied to some dishes not containing scallop at all but which are prepared in a similar fashion. The brightly colored, symmetrical, fan-shaped shells of scallops with their radiating and often fluted sculpture are valued by shell collectors, and have been used since ancient times as motifs in art, architecture and design.

Scallops do produce pearls, though the pearls do not have the buildup of layers, or “nacre”, and may not have luster or iridescence. They can be dull, small and of varying color, but there are exceptions that are appreciated for their aesthetic qualities.

Text from Wikipedia

Rosemary Focaccia / Focaccia med Rosmarin

A classic Italian bread recipe found on goodhousekeeping.com
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Breads made with olive oil are best enjoyed on the day of baking,
but can be frozen.

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Chinese Kung Pao Shrimp / Kinesisk Kung Pao Reker

A spicy Szechuan recipe found at about.com/food/
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traditional badge ethnic speciality_flatA classic Chinese dish from the Szechuan province – spicy, slightly sweet and incredibly delicious.

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Roasted Shrimps on a Bed of Rice / Ristede Reker på Risseng

A lunsj recipe found on “Risretter” (Rice Dishes)
published  by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980

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The History of Margarine

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000_margarine_01Margarine originated with the discovery by French chemist Michel Eugène Chevreul in 1813 of margaric acid (itself named after the pearly deposits of the fatty acid from Greek μαργαρίτης or μάργαρον (margaritēs /márgaron), meaning pearl-oyster or pearl, or μαργαρίς (margarís), meaning palm-tree, hence the relevance to palmitic acid). Scientists at the time regarded margaric acid, like oleic acid and stearic acid, as one of the three fatty acids that, in combination, form most animal fats. In 1853, the German structural chemist Wilhelm Heinrich Heintz analyzed margaric acid as simply a combination of stearic acid and the previously unknown palmitic acid.

000_margarine_08Emperor Napoleon III of France offered a prize to anyone who could make a satisfactory butter alternative, suitable for use by the armed forces and the lower classes. French chemist Hippolyte Mège-Mouriès invented a substance he called oleomargarine, which became shortened to the trade name margarine. Mège-Mouriès patented the concept in 1869 and expanded his initial manufacturing operation from France but had little commercial success. In 1871, he sold the patent to the Dutch company Jurgens, now part of Unilever. In the same year a German pharmacist, Benedict Klein from Cologne, founded the first margarine factory “Benedict Klein Margarinewerke”, producing the brands Overstolz and Botteram.

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000_margarine_05In John Steele’s 1850 California gold miner’s journal, he wrote: “I became acquainted with Mr. Dainels, from Baltimore, who manufactured butter from tallow and lard, and it looked and tasted so much like real butter, that… I could not tell the difference. However, he deceived no one, but sold it for just what it was. He never explained the process of its manufacturer, and whether he was the originator of oleomargarine I do not know.”

The principal raw material in the original formulation of margarine was beef fat. In 1871, Henry W. Bradley of Binghamton, New York received U.S. Patent 110,626 for a process of creating margarine that combined vegetable oils (primarily 000_margarine_07cottonseed oil) with animal fats.Shortages in beef fat supply combined with advances by Boyce and Sabatier in the hydrogenation of plant materials soon accelerated the use of Bradley’s method, and between 1900 and 1920 commercial oleomargarine was produced from a combination of animal fats and hardened and unhardened vegetable oils. The depression of the 1930s, followed by the rationing of World War II, led to a reduction in supply of animal fat; and, by 1945, “original” margarine almost completely disappeared from the market.[17] In the United States, problems with supply, coupled with changes in legislation, caused manufacturers to switch almost completely to vegetable oils and fats (oleomargarine) by 1950 and the industry was ready for an era of product development.

000_margarine_02While butter that cows produced had a slightly yellow color, margarine had a white color, making the margarine look more like lard. Many people found it to look unappetizing. Around the late 1880s the manufacturers decided to dye the margarine yellow, so it would sell more. Dairy firms, especially in Wisconsin, became alarmed and succeeded in getting legislation passed to prohibit the coloring of the stark white product. In response, the margarine companies distributed the margarine together with a packet of yellow dye. The product was placed in a bowl and the dye mixed in with a spoon. This took some time and effort and it was not unusual for the final product to be served as a light and dark yellow, or even white, striped product. During World War 000_margarine_10II, there was a shortage of butter in the United States and “oleomargarine” became popular. In 1951 the W. E. Dennison Company received U.S. Patent 2,553,513 for a method to place a capsule of yellow dye inside a plastic package of margarine. After purchase, the capsule was broken inside the package and then the package was kneaded to distribute the dye. Around 1955, the artificial coloring laws were repealed and margarine could for the first time be sold colored like butter.

During WWII rationing, only two types of margarine were available in the UK, a premium brand and a cheaper budget brand. With the end of rationing in 1955, the market was opened to the forces of supply and demand, and brand marketing became prevalent. The competition between the major producers was given further impetus with the beginning of commercial television advertising in 1955 and, throughout the 1950s and 1960s, competing companies vied with each other to produce the margarine that tasted most like butter.

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In the mid-1960s, the introduction of two lower-fat blends of butter oil and vegetable oils in Scandinavia, called Lätt & Lagom and Bregott, clouded the issue of what should be called “margarine” and began the debate that led to the introduction of the term “spread”. In 1978, an 80% fat product called krona, made by churning a blend of dairy cream and vegetable oils, was introduced in Europe and, in 1982, a blend of cream and vegetable oils called clover was introduced in the UK by the Milk Marketing Board. The vegetable oil and cream spread I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter! was introduced into the United States in 1981 and in the United Kingdom and Canada in 1991.

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In recent decades, margarine spreads have gone through many developments in efforts to improve their healthfulness. Most brands have phased out the use of hydrogenated oils, and are now also trans fat free. Many brands have launched refrigerator-stable margarine spreads that contain only 1/3 of the fat and calorie content of traditional spreads. Other varieties of spreads include those with added Omega-3 fatty acids, those with low or no salt, those with added plant sterols, claimed to reduce blood cholesterol, and some made from olive oil or certified vegan oils.

Text from wikipedia

Pizza alla Napoletana / Neapolitan Pizza / Napolitansk Pizza

A classic pizza recipe from ”Pizza”, a book in the “Kjøkkenbiblioteket” (The Kitchen Library) series published
by Aventura Forlag  in 1992

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Along with Pizza Margherita this specialty from Naples is one of the most popular in Italy. If  baked like the ones on the picture it can be served as an appetizer. And you don’t like anchovies, capers or olives may  be used instead.

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The Hunter Midnight Snack / Jegerens Nattmat

A recipe for a tasty evening meal found on frukt.no
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This dish is based on a German variation on the Scandinavian sour cabbage; fried cabbage with bacon and cooked in dark beer. A tasteful evening snack for hungry hunters or weary skiers.

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Exciting Raw Vegetable Dish / Spennende Råkost

A nice vegetarian lunch dich from “Lettvint For Små Familier” (Easy For Small Families) published by
Hjemmets Bokklubb in 1979

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This dish can be served as a light lunch with wholemeal bread, or it can be used as a starter or accessory for a fish dish. Even common fishfingers will rise to the occation if paired with these vegetables.

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Oven-Fried Chicken / Ovnsstekt Kylling

A recipe from an ad for Mazola Oil published in
LIFE magazine in 1956

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Homemade Mayonnaise / Hjemmelaget Majones

A recipe from an ad for Wesson Oil published in 1933556_Homemade mayonnaise_post

When I started this blog I used a lot of recipes from old ads as those of you who have followed the blog all along might remember. I felt a little nostalgic to day, so here are two recipes from old ads for you 😉

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Recipe posted at:
Tickle My Tastebuds Tuesday[4]TuesdaysTable copyTreasure Box Tuesday[4]

Coriander & Ginger Herring / Koriander & Ingefærsild

A new variation on the Scandinavian pickled herrings found on grytelokket .no115_koriander og ingefærsild_post

Scandinavians are wild about pickled and potted herring and new variations turns up ever so often. Among these are coriander and ginger herring, but you can safely put it on the Christmas buffet along with the other herring jars, or give it away to someone you know will like it. This pickled herring is going to be a Christmas classic.

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See this and lots of other delicious recipes on:
fiestafriday TuesdaysTable copy

Cured Beef / Gravet Oksekjøtt

A traditional curing recipe found on grytelokket.com112_gravet oksekjøtt_post

In the old days, curing  meat was a virtue of necessity, while it is today generally considered a delicacy. Many believe that curing meat is difficult, but it is actually a much easier process than most imagine. With this recipe for cured sirloin of beef and mustard sauce you can try for yourself.

My brother in law, a very skilled cook, makes a wicked cured beef for Christmas every year and serves it with cherry tomatoes, fresh dill and horseradish sauce. For me it is one of the absolute culinary highlights of Christmas season.

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See this and lots of other delicious recipes on:
fiestafridayhappy holiday link partyTuesdaysTable-copy52