Karriboller Og Kokosris / Curry Meatballs And Coconut Rice

A contemporary Norwegian dinner recipe found on rema.no
Karriboller Og Kokosris / Curry Meatballs And Coconut Rice

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Rema 1000 – A part of Norwegian grocers history

It began with the pursuit of a retail concept that was different than the traditional corner store. On a study trip to Germany in 1977 representatives of the Reitan Group were  impressed by the German discount chain ALDI’s implemented simplicity. When Odd Reitan opened the first REMA grocers February 15th, 1979 at Bromstad in Trondheim it was an ALDI imitation.

The initial phase

In the initial phase the selection was limited to 500-600 articles, but this range was too narrow to be profitable. The store in Mo i Rana, which opened the following year, therefore increased the range of products to 1,000 articles. This was a great success and was continued in the three stores which from then went by the name REMA. It also led to the name of the chain being changed to Rema 1000 – an abbreviation for Reitan Food, 1000 articles.

Expansion

The REMA 1000 concept has over the years been developed and improved, and the range of articles has changed in step with the times and customers’ shopping habits. But the Reitan Group still work by the same original philosophy.

Today

The Reitan family are among the richest people in Norway and not long ago people like that had a social conscience. But not in our day and age, The Reitan Group has recently changed their beer distribution routines to increase their earnings even more and it is already begining to cost people their jobs at local breweries. Mack Brewery in Tromsø announced today that they are forced to let 35 people go.

Medieval Monday – Pork Pie / Pai Med Svinekjøtt

A historic pie recipe found on mediumaevum.tumblr.comHeadingMedieval Monday - Pork Pie / Pai Med Svinekjøtt

Tak fayre porke y-broylid, & grynd it smal with yolkys of Eyroun; than take Pepir, Gyngere, & grynd it smal, & melle it with-al, & a lytel hony, & floryssche thin cofyns with-ynne & with-owte, & hele hem with thin ledys, & late hem bake, & serue forth – Original recipe

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Toast Place Concorde

A delicious toast recipe found in “Matglede Som Aldri Før”
(Joy of Food Like Never Before) published by
Skaninavisk Press as in 1977

Toast Place Concorde

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Russian Meatballs / Russiske Kjøttboller

A Russian recipe found in “Internasjoale Familie Favoritter”
(International Family Favourites) published in 1976

Russian Meatballs / Russiske Kjøttboller

If you love recipes with a lot of ingredients this recipe will really
make your day. That is a promise – Ted  😉

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Million Mince with Mash / Millionbøf med Mos

A classic Danish lunch/dinner recipe found on familiejournal.dk
Million Mince with Mash / Millionbøf med Mos

Million mince is a delicious dish and it is very easy to make. When many ingredients are allowed to simmer with the meat, you get an incredibly nice mince that tastes great.

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Cevapcici – Yugoslavian Meatballs / Jugoslaviske Kjøttkaker

A classic dish from the Balkans found in “God Mat fra
Hele Verden” (Great Food From all over The World)
published in 1971

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Meatballs are found in all countries in many different varieties. In Yugoslavia they are usually formed in the shape of croquettes. The farce can be made from pure beef or a mixture of beef and veal or pork. The seasoning is hotter than we are used to in Western Europe. The meatballs should be sharply browned, but must not be cooked dry.

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A Delicate Chewit / En Delikat Chewit

A 16th century recipe found on historyextra.com
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In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, Sam recreates a delicate chewit – a meat and fruit pie enjoyed in the 16th century.

Sam writes: Britain loves pies, and recipes for them can be found in cookbooks going back centuries. This month I’ve chosen a 16th-century pie called a chewit that mixes sweet and savoury flavours – a combination that was popular in the Tudor era. Recipes from that time often refer to coffins – robust pastry designed more to contain the filling than to be eaten. My version, including measurements, is based on a 16th-century recipe.

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Coney Island Chili Dogs / Coney Island Chilipølser i Brød

A classic chillidog recipe found on lostrecipesfound.com
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In Southeastern Michigan, “Coney Island” refers to 24-hour diners, and, the specific kind of chili-topped, grilled hot-dogs those diners serve. Invented in 1914 at a Jackson, Michigan joint called Todoroff’s Original Coney Island.

The dogs–with their beanless, meaty chili (or “sauce” as it’s called in Michigan), were so popular, many other operators soon spun their own versions.

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Greek Lamb Balls on Skewers with Tzatziki / Greske Lammeboller på Spyd med Tzatziki

A classic Greek recipe found on matprat.no
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Tzatziki (English pronunciation: /tætˈsiːki/, /tsætˈsiːki/, or /tɑːtˈsiːki/; Greek: τζατζίκι [dzaˈdzici] or [dʒaˈdʒici] or in Cypriot Greek: τταλαττούρι ) is a Greek sauce served with grilled meats or as a dip. Tzatziki is made of strained yogurt (usually from sheep or goat milk) mixed with cucumbers, garlic, salt, olive oil, red wine vinegar, and sometimes dill. American versions may include lemon juice, mint, or parsley.

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Cauliflower Tart / Blomkålterte

A nice lunch recipe found in “Sommermat” (Summer Food)
published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1979
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I readily admit that cauliflower is not one of my favourite vegetables, but I really think I might enjoy this tart. The cheesy sauce might just do the trick. And well, tarts are tarts, aren’t they – Ted

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Cottage Pie / Cottage Pai

A classic English recipe found on essentially-england.com523_Cottage Pie_post

Cottage pie is a British classic dish. It is hearty, fillng and warming food, but frankly, is quite delicious at any time of the year.

There may look to be a lot of ingredients, but do not be put off. It is well worth the effort. Use minced beef, or be ultra thrifty, and use up leftover beef from the Sunday roast to make your pie authentic.

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Pasties with Mint, Ginger and Peas / Piroger med Mynte, Ingefær og Erter

A great picnic recipe found on cookingcannaltv.com461_Beef Pasties with Mint, Ginger and Peas_post

Reinvent the Cornish pasty — a crimped half-moon pastry filled with beef and root vegetables — by sourcing flavors found in Mexican empanadas and Indian samosas.

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Chicken Meat Patties / Kyllingkjøttkaker

A new take on the traditional Norwegian meat patties
found on matprat.no
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Traditional Norwegian meat patties are typically made of beef mince, but could just as well be made of chicken mince. With gravy, stewed cabbage and lingonberry jam the chicken patties get the right traditional touch.

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Stuffed Pancakes / Pannekaker med Kjøttfyll

A recipe from “Varme Småretter” (Hot Snacks), a book in the
“Ingrids Beste” series published by Gyldendal in 1991
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This minced meat and pancakes combination is not very common,
but it is certainly worth a try.

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Cabbage Roulettes with White Sauce / Kålruletter med Hvit Saus

A traditional dinner recipe from “Gode, Gamle Oppskrifter” (Good, Old Recipes) by Ingrid Espelid Hovig published by Gyldendal in 1991
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This is tasty food for young and old. Cabbage roulettes are at their best made with summer cabbage or freshly harvested winter cabbage. Cabbage stored throughout the winter often gets a bit chewy. Leaf of Chinese cabbage can also be used. As filling for cabbage rolls you can use the same farce as for meatball, but make the farce a little looser. Shop bought meat farce has a nice consistency and is easy to use.

Cabbage roulettes has a long tradition as Sunday dinner here in Norway.

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