Wallenbergare – Swedish Luxury Patties / Svenske Luxus Karbonader

A recipe from rimi.no – Photo from gubbröra.taffel

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traditional badge3Wallenbergare is a luxury patty which consists of finely ground veal. Other ingredients include: cream, egg yolks, salt, pepper and fresh breadcrumbs. Wallenbergaren should be fried very lightly and be light inside and only light brown on the surface. Wallenbergare is often served with boiled potatoes or mashed potatoes, cranberry jam and green peas.

The dish is named after magistrate Marcus Wallenberg, whose father-in-law was a doctor and cookbook author Charles Emil Hagdahl.

I love the way the Swedes have a habit of giving names to dishes and other things. Wallenbergare sounds so much better than just calling them veal patties – Ted

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Plum Compote / Plommekompott

A traditional recipe found at spar.no

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traditional badge2Plum compote is a delicious dessert that often evokes nostalgia in many of us. Server it lukewarm with whipped cream and some almond flakes.

The nostalgic feeling is no exaggeration, at least not for me. I grew up with compotes both at home and at my grandmother’s. Back in the fifties and of course before that it was important to use the fruit harvest when it was fresh. Either for deserts or preserves.  In this day and age you can buy fresh fruits and berries all year round, but back then these were not imported from around the world here in Norway, but were available at the grocers only when they were in season. Today Norway is one of the richest countries in the world and we can afford to import what ever we like from anywhere. Back then the story was quite different. The Germans had left the northern part of the country in ruins and their torpedoes had sunk a great part of our commercial navy, the backbone of our pre-war economy – Ted

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Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Sinalco

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Sinalco advertising on a Wall in Berlin, 1909

991_sinalco_02 Sinalco is a popular brand of non-alcoholic drinks first marketed in 1902, with sales in now more than 40 countries. Sinalco is the oldest soft drink brand in Europe. It is produced by Sinalco International, a company head- quartered in Duisburg, Germany.

In 1902, German scientist Friedrich Eduard Bilz invented "Bilz Brause", a sherbet powder, and started to sell it in partnership with industrialist Franz Hartmann. As imitations started to appear, 991_sinalco_05they held a prize competition for a brand name, and chose "Sinalco" (an abbreviation of the Latin sine alcohole, "without alcohol"). As one of the first beverage brands, Sinalco came to be exported worldwide, particularly to South America and the Middle East. The red circle trademark was registered in 1937. A distinctively-shaped bottle was launched in the 1950s, and updated at the end of the century. Besides the original Sinalco Orange, today the company also bottles Sinalco Cola and a few other kinds of soft drinks. In Germany, it is the third most popular soft drink, after Fanta and Sprite.

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Products

Sinalco’s basic line of 991_sinalco_03
products include:

  • Sinalco Cola
  • Sinalco Orange
  • Sinalco Bitter Lemon
  • Sinalco Lemon Lime
  • Sinalco Cloudy Lemon
  • Sinalco Special
  • Sinalco Apple
  • Sinalco Rosso
  • Sinalco Fresco
  • Sinalco Caribico
  • Sinalco Proset Beer

 

In context:
Sherbet history

Beginning with the 19th century sherbet powder (soda powder) became popular."Put a spoonful of the powder in a cup of water, mix it and drink it as soon as possible, during the time of sparkling. … Because this way the most of acid of air is lost … it is more practicable to put the powder into the mouth and flush it with some water." 2 g of sodium bicarbonate and 1.5 g of tartaric acid were separately packed in little coloured paper bags.

Ingredients

Sherbet is a fizzy powder, containing sugar and flavouring, and an edible acid and base. The acid may be tartaric, citric or malic acid, and the base may be sodium bicarbonate, sodium carbonate,magnesium carbonate, or a mixture of these and/or other similar carbonates . To this is added a large amount of sugar to mask the unappetising flavour of the reactive powders, and fruit or cream soda flavouring.

The acid-carbonate reaction occurs upon presence of moisture (juice/saliva). Sherbet used to be stirred into various beverages to make effervescing drinks, in a similar way to making lemonade from lemonade powders, before canned carbonated drinks became ubiquitous. Sherbet is now used to mean this powder sold as a sweet. (In the United States, it would be somewhat comparable to the powder in Pixy Stix or Fun Dip, though having the fizzy quality of effervescing candy, such as Pop Rocks.)

Text from Wikipedia

Baked Marzipan Apples / Bakte Marsipanepler

A recipe from “Ovnsretter” (Baked Dishes) published by Hjemmet’s Kokebok Klubb in 1977

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Summer Bowle / Sommerbowle

A recipe fom “Sommermat” (Summer Food) published by HJemmet’s Kokebok Klubb in 1979

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From my rather extensive collection of family-, news- and women’s magazines from the forties, fifties and sixties (we’re talking several thousands here) I have gathered that bowles in lots of variations were very popular in Scandinavia back then. Partiqularly in the forties and fifties.

“Would you like a little something from the bowle”. It sounds so much more sophisticated  than than just mixing the odd cocktails don’t you think  – Ted 😉

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Hazelnut Brittle Ice Cream / Krokanis

A classic recipe from rimi.no – Recipe by: Christopher Sjuve

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traditional badge2Hazelnut brittle ice cream is a type of ice cream I have never found anywhere else than in Norway, on the other hand here it is a real classic. When I was a kid back in the fifties you could only get three types of desert ice creams in Norway; Vanilla, Tress (one part strawberry ice cream, one part vanilla ice cream and of one part chocolate ice cream) and hazelnut brittle ice cream which was my favourite then and is my favourite still.

This is the way to make delicious, homemade hazelnut brittle ice cream. Try it, you wont regret it – Ted 🙂

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Summer Plate With Scrambled Eggs And Cured Ham / Sommertallerken Med Eggerøre Og Spekeskinke

A classic recipe found on rimi.no – Recipe by : Marit Røttingsnes Westlie

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traditional badge2Back in the fifties, sixties and seventies there wasn’t an outdoor restaurant in Norway without this dish on the menu. It was the ultimate summer dish back then and I’ve had it at the outdoor restaurant in the sculpture park at Frogner in Oslo more times than than I can count. It was gone from the menus for ages to give room for Italian and French dishes but luckily our best chefs have created a new interest in our own culinary tradition so it’s back now.

By the way, the summer plate is very often followed by the other one of todays dishes, ice cream with hazelnut brittle. Don’t miss the combination if you’re ever in Norway – Ted

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China Chicken With Natural Rice / Kinakylling Med Naturris

A recipe from “Den Nye Maten” (The New Food) published by Aschehoug in 1979

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Chinese cuisine is incredibly fresh, elegant and lean. It is just the thing for dietfood that saturates without giving too many calories. Despite all the ingredients this dish is quick to make. Remember to buy the chicken pre-grilled.

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Related articles

Cloudberry Cream / Moltekrem

 

A recipe found on dinmat.no – Source: Opplysningskontoret for Meieriprodukter

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traditional badge2Cloudberry season is short, pick them while you can. Clean and sweeten them before you put them in the freezer. Take them out and enjoy at a suitable opportunity. If cloudberries are hard to come by round your neck of the wood the recipe works just as well for raspberries or blackberries.

Cloudberry cream is a very traditional Norwegian desert. For many it is a must at Christmas and I’ve eaten it Christmas eve all my life and wouldn’t dream of having any other desert that day. Its quick and easy to make and heavenly delicious – Ted

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Caramelized Banana With Vanilla Ice Cream / Karamellisert Banan Med Vaniljeis

A recipe from “Dreyers Kokebok I Farger” (Dreyer’s Cook Book In Colours) published by Dreyer in 1968

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A delicious and very simple desert from way back in the sixties 🙂

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Patties With Onion, The Perfect Evening Snack / Carbonade Med Like, Perfect Till Kveldskosen

A recipe found on dinmat.no – Source: Opplysningskontoret for egg og kjøtt

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Patties are foods that everyone likes. Served at both lunch and dinner, the buffet and in many parties. Or why not enjoy the patties on good bread with fried onions and a little salad as an evening snack.

If I had a dollar for each time I have eaten this evening snack I would have been a rich man to day. I usually fry up 20 – 30 patties and put them in the fridge so  I can pick out one or two If a get a little peckish when night falls. Always delicious, always satisfying – Ted 😉

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Ginger Tart With Hazelnut-brittle Bottom / Ingefærterte Med Krokanbunn

A recipe from “Kaker Til Kaffen” (Cakes For The Coffee) published by Hjemmets Kokebok Klubb in 1979

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Pear and Stilton toast / Pære Og Stilton Toast

A recipe found on dinmat.noSource: Stavanger Aftenblad

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Pears and blue cheese is an excellent combination. What about a tasty little sandwich, you can grill walnut bread or country-style bread. Dress bread with crispy salads and top it with pear and blue cheese au gratin. The blue cheese can be English Stilton as here, or you can use a local variant.

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Walter Baker & Co’s Chocolate, Cocoa & Candy Recipes published in 1909 in pdf

 

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Here’s a little treat for all you lovers of chocolate and cocoa; “Walter Baker & Co’s Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes By Miss Parloa and Home Made Candy Recipes By Mrs Janet McKenzie Hill” published in 1909.

64 pages of chocolate and candy delight, richly illustrated with beautiful colour lithographies. And all you need to do to make it yours in pdf format is to click the image above and download it. More old cook book’s in pdf may follow at a later date  Enjoy – Ted
You can also download the book by clicking here –> pdf_thumb When the pdf opens, move your mouse cursor down in the right hand corner and click the diskette symbol.

Köttbullar Med Gräddsky – Meatballs With Cream Sauce / Kjøttboller Med Fløtesause

A Recipe from “Kullinarisk Pass” (Culinary Passport) published by Tupperware in 1970

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Köttbullar Med Gräddsky is for many Swedes the most Swedish of dinners and the dish is just as popular in Norway. Just about every Swedish family have their own recipe and way to serve the dish. Some serve it with mashed potatoes, some with boiled. 973_kjötbullarSome with pickled gherkins, some with cucumber salad, but few serve the dish without cranberry jam. And as anywhere else in the world you can get the most popular dishes in cans or frozen in boxes or plastic bags, so also with Köttbullar Med Gräddsky in Sweden.

When Scandinavians feel like Köttbullar Med Gräddsky they often drop by IKEA where it is always served in the cafeteria the year round.

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