Mussels In Dressing / Blåskjell i Dressing

A simple quick and delicious starter recipe found in “Forretter” (Starters) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980

Mussels In Dressing / Blåskjell i Dressing

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Mussels in Dill Sauce / Blåskjell i Dillsaus

A recipe for a cold shellfish dish found in “Alt om Urter”
(All About Herbs) published by Den Norske Bokklubb in 1985
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Most Scandinavians are crazy when it comes to shellfish of any kind and I’m noe exception. I’ve posted lots of recipes for mussels already. Here’s another one – Ted 😉

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"Hot" Fish Balls / "Hete" Fiskeboller

A recipe from “Godt i microbølgeovn” (Delicious in the Microwave)
in the book series “Ingrids Beste”
published by Gyldendal in 1991
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Ingrid Espelid Hovig was Norway’s TV cook so long that people under fifty hardly remember a time when she was not introducing us all to both new and traditional dishes in her easy and freiendly manner.

The book this recipe is taken from is from a series of books called Ingrids Beste (Ingrid’s Best). This particular book deals with food made in microwaves and was published more than 25 years ago when microwave ovens was seen as the modern housewife’s salvation providing quick and practical cooking.

Our wievs on microwave ovens have change drastically since then, but remember, the recipes in this book can of course be cooked in more traditional manners. And honestly. it might  make them even better – Ted  😉

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Deep Fried Shellfish with Greek Sauce / Frityrstekte Skalldyr med Gresk Saus

A delicious starter/snack recipe found in “Forretter” (Starters)
published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1982

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Deep fried mussels, shrimp, crayfish and other types of shelfish are suitable as a starter or snacks. A mixture of various shellfish and boiled fish cut into pieces, offers many delicious possibilities.

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Curry Mussels / Blåskjell i Karri

A hot shelfish recipe found in “Carl Butlers Kokebok – Fortsettelsen” (Carl Butler’s Cook Book – The Continuance)
published in 1991

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Nordic cookbook history was written in 1974. That year a bunch of foodie friends published a cookbook that would become one of Scandinavia’s most popular, Carl Butler’s Cookbook. With folded corners, patches of pie dough, tomato and French mustard and an unmistakable scent of herbal spices and garlic it can be found in hundreds of thousands of Swedish, Finnish, Danish and Norwegian homes. The book put for the first time coq au vin, moussaka and paté on our tables.

For all Scandinavians who like me love this cook book it took 17 years before we could hurry to the book shops to buy the continuance. It was simply called “Carl Butlers Kokebok – Fortsettelsen” (Carl Butler’s Cook Book – The Continuance). This recipe is from that book – Ted

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Mussels Salad with Cheese Sauce / Blåskjellsalat med Ostesaus

A shellfish recipe found on Norsk Ukeblads “Store Salatbok”
(Big Salad Book) published in 1985

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Marine mussels are abundant in the low and mid intertidal zone in temperate seas globally. Other species of marine mussel live in tropical intertidal areas, but not in the same huge numbers as in temperate zones.

Certain species of marine mussels prefer salt marshes or quiet bays, while others thrive in pounding surf, completely covering wave-washed rocks. Some species have colonized abyssal depths near hydrothermal vents. The South African white mussel exceptionally doesn’t bind itself to rocks but burrows into sandy beaches extending two tubes above the sand surface for ingestion of food and water and exhausting wastes.

Freshwater mussels inhabit permanent lakes, rivers, canals and streams throughout the world except in the polar regions. They require a constant source of cool, clean water. They prefer water with a substantial mineral content, using calcium carbonate to build their shells.

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Mussel Brose / Blåskjellsuppe

A classic Scotish mussel soup recipe found in
“The Cooking of The British Isles” published in 1970

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Mussel Brose or Mussel Broth is a regional dish of Scotland. The word ‘Brose’ was used to mean a thick broth or old-fashioned potage. In Scotland the most common thickener was oatmeal. 

Scotland has very famous mussel beds, producing some of the finest mussels in the world, and if you can source fresh mussels from Scotland they will be wonderful in this broth.

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Fish Soup Charlottenburg / Fiskesuppe Charlottenburg

A classic recipe found in “Festmat” (Party Food)
published by Hjemmets kokebokklubb in 1982

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There’s nothing better than hot, homemade soup to assuage the cold-weather blues. And this classic German fish soup will do the trick every time.

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Chinese Stir-fry Clams in Black Bean Sauce / Kinesiske Wokkede Muslinger i Svart Bønnesaus

A wok recipe found on about.com/food/
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Fermented black beans can be found at Asian markets; but if unavailable, you can substitute prepared black bean sauce.

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Medieval Monday – Muscules In Shelle / Blåskjell

A medieval recipe found on One Year and Thousand Eggs

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About Eva GrelsdotterEva Grelsdotter writes: This very easy recipe and very similar to modern mussel soup recipes. Preparing the mussels for the dish takes some time because you have to clean them separately and remove their beard. Never use mussels that are open (or does not close their shells when tapping them gently with a knife). because they are dead. And never eat the mussels that are not open after cooking! Otherwise you might get a bad food poisoning.

Original recipe from Harleian MS. 4016, Volume II: Take and pick fair mussels, and cast them in a pot; and cast them to, minced onions, And good quantity of pepper and wine, And a little vinegar; and as soon as they begin to gape, take them from the fire, and serve it forth with the same broth in a dish all hot.

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See this and lots of other delicious recipes on:
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Mussels à la Poulette – Blåskjell á la Poulette

A recipe from “Mat For Alle Årstider” (Food For All Seasons) published by Det Beste in 1977

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In France the mussels in this classic dish are served in their own half shells and eaten with the fingers. The bread is dipped into the sauce and eaten. You can also clean the mussels and serve them without shells in a sauce or soup.

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