Fruit Bars / Frukt Ruter

A fruit cookie recipe found in “Cooky Jar Favorites”
published by The Tested Recipe Institute in 1960

Fruit Bars / Frukt Ruter

Bake quick and comforting fruit bars with a just few simple ingredients. A delicious flashback from those carefree first pre-WWII decades. They’re the perfect treats to serve for everything from Sunday dessert to summer picnics and celebrations of any kind.

As Contry Joe & the Fish once sang; Bring Back The Sixties, Man 😉

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Apple Pork / Epleflesk

A Swedish dinner recipe found in “Matglede Som Aldri Før”
(Joy of Food Like Never Before) published by
Skaninavisk Press as in 1977

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This is an old and popular dish in Sweden, but for Mrs. Newlywed, it might just be a première. (Top text of the recipe)

Isn’t it strange that even at the end a seventies there was no discussion about who belonged in the kitchen, it was the lady of the house – Ted  😉

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Caraway Pretzels / Karvekringler

A surprising pretzel recipe found in “Det Nye Kjøkkenbiblioteket”
(The New Kitchen Library) published in 1971

Caraway Pretzels / Karvekringler

These delectable small pretzels have – as the name tells – caraway among the ingredients. Many may frown at the thought of caraway in pastries. If you ar not a great caraway fan you might go a little easy on the stuff – at least on the first try. You might to you surprise find it quite delicious.

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Royal Rhubarb Crisp / Kongelig Rabarbra Dessert

A delicious dessert recipe found on allrecipes.com
Royal Rhubarb Crisp / Kongelig Rabarbra Dessert

If you love rhubarb-strawberry mixtures, you’ll love
this sweet rhubarb crisp.

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Dorset Apple Cake / Dorset Eplekake

A classic English kake recipe found on bbcgoodfood.com
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A rustic bake with chunks of sweet fruit and a crunchy
demerara sugar topping.

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Apricot & Ginger Loaf / Aprikos- og Ingefærkake

A classic fruit cake recipe found on odlum.ie
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Smith College Fudge / Fudge fra Smith College

A recipe from “Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes by Miss Paloa”
published  Baker’s & Co in 1909

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An American-style fudge (containing chocolate) was found in a letter written by Emelyn Battersby Hartridge, a student at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York. She wrote that her schoolmate’s cousin made fudge in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1889 and sold it for 40 cents a pound. Hartridge obtained the fudge recipe and, in 1890, made 30 lb (14 kg) of fudge for the Vassar College Senior Auction.This Vassar fudge recipe became quite popular at the school for years to come.

Word of this popular confectionery spread to other women’s colleges. For example, Wellesley College and Smith College have their own versions of a fudge recipe dating from the late 19th or early 20th century.

Fudge-making evolved a variety of flavors and additives as it grew beyond its popularity at colleges.

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Medieval Monday – Fake Fish / Falsk Fisk

A virtuous lent oriented recipe found on historyextra.com
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In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, Sam recreates fake fish – a medieval apple pie for Lent.

In the Middle Ages, people were instructed not to eat meat during Lent. Yet the ban didn’t apply to fish – in fact, Dutch gourmets enjoyed serving up ‘fish’ dishes so much that they devised this fish-shaped apple pie. With no animal products, it’s every bit as virtuous as it is delicious.

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The History of Condiments

condiments_01Since ancient times people have used condiments to enhance their food. The first condiment was salt. Salt has always been used both as a preservative and to enhance the flavor of food. Vinegar has also been used since ancient times. Its name is probably derived from the French words vin aiger meaning sour wine. (Vinegar was used as a medicine as well as a food).

The Romans liked condiments and they made many sauces for their food. One of the most common was a fish sauce called liquamen. The Romans also grew mustard and they introduced it into the parts of Europe they conquered. They also made mint sauce.

condiments_02In the Middle Ages mustard was a popular condiment in Europe. At first English mustard consisted of coarse powder and it was not very strong. However in 1720 a Mrs Clements of Durham began making a much smoother mustard powder. When mixed with water to make paste it was very hot but it proved to be popular and Durham became a center of the mustard industry. (For centuries mustard was used as a medicine as well as a food).

In the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries new condiments were invented. Pesto sauce was invented in 16th century Italy. Furthermore new sauces were invented in the 17th century including bechamel and chasseur. Chutney comes from India. It was first exported to England in the 17th century. Soy sauce, which was invented in China reached Europe in the 17th century and by the mid-18th century it was popular in Britain.

condiments_03According to one story a French chef first made mayonnaise in 1756. However there are many stories about where it comes from. Hollandaise sauce was also first recorded in the mid-18th century. Ketchup began life as a Chinese fish sauce called ke-tsiap. The name was gradually changed to ketchup and in Britain people added other ingredients instead of fish. In the 18th century they began adding tomatoes. Sauces similar to tartar sauce were made in the Middle Ages but ‘modern’ tartar sauce was first made in the 1800s

condiments_04In the 19th century with the Industrial Revolution condiments began to be mass-produced in factories. Tomato ketchup was a best seller and HP sauce was invented at the end of the 19th century. Meanwhile Worcester sauce was invented in Worcester in 1835 by John Lea and William Perrins. Horseradish sauce went on sale in bottles in the USA around 1860. Salad cream was invented in 1914.

As well as sauces people have also looked for ways to sweeten their food. Since the time of the Ancient Egyptians and probably before people have kept bees for honey. Over condiments_05the centuries honey was very valuable and it was sometimes used as a currency or it was given as a tribute to a conqueror. Since ancient times people have also made an alcoholic drink called mead from honey.

Sugar cane first grew in South Asia. Later the Arabs and Europeans grew sugar cane. At the end of the 15th century sugar cane was taken to the New World. Sugar was first made from sugar beet in the 18th century. A German chemist called Andreas Marggraf was the first person to make sugar from beet in 1747. Saccharine was invented in 1879 by Constantine Fahlberg.

Text from localhistories.org

Old Fashioned Butterscotch Cake / Gammeldags Butterscotch Kake

A classiccake recipe found on cookingchanneltv.com
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Butterscotch is a type of confectionery whose primary ingredients are brown sugar and butter, although other ingredients are part of some recipes, such as corn syrup,cream, vanilla, and salt. The earliest known recipes in the middle 19th century used treacle in place of or in addition to sugar.

Butterscotch is similar to toffee, but for butterscotch the sugar is boiled to the soft crack stage, and not hard crack as with toffee. Butterscotch sauce, made of butterscotch and cream, is used as a topping for ice cream (particularly sundaes).

The term butterscotch is also often used more specifically of the flavour of brown sugar and butter together, even where the actual confection butterscotch is not involved, such as in butterscotch pudding and butterscotch sauce.

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American Flapjacks / Amerikanske Flapjacks

A classic baking recipe found in Marguerite Patten’s
“Cookery in Colour” published in 1960
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A flapjack, muesli bar, cereal bar, or granola bar is a sweet tray-baked oat bar made from rolled oats, butter, brown sugar and golden syrup.

The item is known as a “flapjack” in the United Kingdom, the Isle of Man and Ireland and as a “muesli bar” or “cereal bar” in Australia and New Zealand. In other countries, including Canada, the United States, and South Africa, such products are referred to as “oat bars”, while the word “flapjack” is used to describe a pancake. In the UK, the term “cereal bar” is often used to describe products which contain fruits, nuts, other cereals apart from oats, and, occasionally, chocolate.

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Russian Apple Tart / Russisk Epleterte

A recipe from “Dessertkaker” (Dessert Cakes) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980
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A shortcrust pastry tart filled with apples and raisins drizzled with demerara sugar, who can resist something like that – Ted 🙂

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Jitterbuggers / Jitterbuggere

A classic recipe found on dansukker.no
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Rhubarb Ketchup / Rabarbraketchup

A rear but delicious ketchup variation found on imagasin.info648_rabarbaraketchup_post

Rhubarb ketchup is a tasty accessory to dishes made with for example grilled or fried  meat from chicken or turkey.

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Red Current Chutney / Ripschutney

A fresh, acidic chutney found on frukt.no 249_ripschutney_post

Red currents is very well suited for chutney with its pronounced and sour taste. Red current chutney is a spicy accessories for Asian food and tastes great alongside matured cheeses.

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Recipe posted at:
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