Cocoanut Rusks / Kokoskavringer

A baking recipe found in “Good Luck Recipes”
published by John F Jelke Co in 1916Cocoanut Rusks / Kokoskavringer

For a book close to a hundred years old, “Good Luck Recipes” features an amazing 32 large full colour illustrations like the one I’ve used
when making the image above. John F Jelke must have sold
an awful lot of margarine

Ted
Winking smile

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Finnan Haddie Balls / Skotsk Blandaball med Røkt Hyse

A traditional Scotish fish dish found in “War Time Recipes”
published by The Proctor & Gamble Co in 1918
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Finnan haddie (also known as Finnan haddock, Finnan, Finny Haddock or Findrum speldings) is cold-smoked haddock, representative of a regional method of smoking with green wood and peat in north-east Scotland. Its origin is the subject of a debate, as some sources attribute the origin to the hamlet of Findon, Aberdeenshire, (also sometimes called Finnan) near Aberdeen, while others insist that the name is a corruption of the village name of Findhorn at the mouth of the River Findhorn in Moray.

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Salmon Curry / Laksekarri

A dinner recipe found in “How To Eat Canned Salmon”
publisert av Alaska Packers Association in 1900

Salmon Curry / Laksekarri

A curry dish with a surprisingly copious use of curry powder the age of the book taken under consideration. In other words, a rather hot curry seen with Western eyes – Ted

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Virginia Spoon Corn Bread / Maisskjebrød Fra Virginia

A bread recipe found in “War Time Recipes”
published by Proctor & Gamble Co in 1918

Virginia Spoon Corn Bread / Maisskjebrød Fra Virginia

Spoon bread, a classic Southern side dish, is actually more like a pudding than a bread. It’s so soft, it can be served – and eaten – with a spoon.

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“A Thousand Ways To Please a Husband” – The First Edition from 1917 in pdf format

A Thousand Ways to Please a Husband

A Thousand Ways To Please a Husband

With Bettina’s Best Recipes

By
Louise Bennet Weaver
&
Helen Cowles le Cron

Illustrated by Elizabeth Coldbourne

:: THE DEDICATION ::
To every other little bride
Who has a ”Bob to please,
And says she’s tried and tried and tried
To cook with skill and ease.
And cant! – we offer here as guide
Bettina’s Recipes!
To her whose ”Bob’ is prone to wear
A sad and hungry look
Because the maid he thought so fair
Is – well – she just can’t cook!
To her we say: do not despair;
Just try Bettina’s Book

This is the first edition from 1917 and it offers a delightful look at homemaking before the advent of sophisticated appliances and fast food as well as the modern reality of women’s work outside the home. Unintentionally funny and historically revealing, the whimsically illustrated narrative abounds in simple and surprisingly relevant recipes.

You can download the book in pdf format
by clicking the icon below

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A Ladies’ Luncheon Served by the Hostess anno 1910

illustration_01This article was printed in “The Hostess” published by the Bromangelon Publishing Department in 1910, and it is making it quite clear that when inviting a few lady friends over for luncheon back then putting a box of Twinings Earl Grey tea bags and a tray of hastily made sandwiches on the table simply wouldn’t do

Ted
Winking smile


Every hostess, however modest her home surroundings, cherishes the ambition to shine in her own little sphere. The ideas suggested in this little book are intended as a guide to simple methods of entertaining in a hospitable, easy, refined and dignified manner, without any undue extravagance. They are intended to serve, not as set patterns to be copied or followed in every detail, but rather to suggest to the ingenious hostess, ways of adapting her own original ideas to the art of graceful home entertainment.

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Most hostesses do not realize the full value and usefulness of the serving table. To serve a meal without a maid  is easy of accomplishment, if one will follow the hints conveyed in this description.

Instead of the more conventional large tablecloth, for this cosy occasion we will use the more decorative embroidered centerpiece and doilies.

A Ladies’ Luncheon Served by the Hostess anno 1910

Place on the embroidered centerpiece an earthen jar or vase filled with honeysuckle or some graceful flowering vine. At each cover place a low, small glass with a long branch of the same vine; a water glass partly filled with cracked ice, a small butter plate, containing a butter ball, the little knife by its side; a doily, on which is the service-plate; to the right, two silver knives (sharp edge toward the plate)—to the left, three forks (the prongs turned up), and the napkin, folded square (monogram side up). On the table are three trays, one containing narrow strips of twice-baked bread; and the two smaller ones holding chocolate or other bonbons, and olives or salted almonds.

Most of this luncheon is prepared in advance, and ten minutes before serving, the hostess excuses herself to her guests to heat the first course and prepare the coffee. Everything else is in readiness.

The Menu

Lobster Newburg on Toast
Finger Slices of Dry Toast
Cold Turkey or Chicken
Hearts of Celery
Twice Baked Bread
Jellied Pecan Salad
Brown Bread Sandwiches
Chocolate Cakes filled with Whipped Cream
Black Coffee
Cheese Straws
Salted Nuts, (or Olives)
Sweets

As the guests enter the dining-room, the first course, Lobster Newburg (or Crab Creole) has already been placed. This has been prepared in advance, and only required quick heating on gas burner or chafing-dish before serving. The serving table with a five o’clock tea cloth of handsome linen stands against the wall to the left of the hostess. This table is of the same height as the luncheon table, and is equipped with a lower shelf of the same size as the table top. On top are placed the water pitcher, ice bowl, after-dinner coffee cups and saucers, the plates, a handsome coffee pot and two covered  trays, one holding cheese straws, the other the  cakes.

A Ladies’ Luncheon Served by the Hostess anno 1910

On the lower shelf, out of sight, are the second and third courses (which are both cold) arranged on plates—the salad plates toward the back, the plates of cold chicken or turkey (dressed with celery hearts and twice-baked bread) towards the front. The four finger bowls, the napkins and extra silver are in a corner at the back.

Each guest, as she receives the plate for the second course, passes her used plate and silver from the first course to the hostess. These used plates are slipped by the hostess into the places just vacated on the lower shelf of the serving table. When the salad comes forward, places are made for the plates from the second course. Thus, as soon as a plate has been used, it vanishes as completely as with the best trained service. After all the plates and silver have been used, they can be placed in piles on the lower shelf, and removed after the departure of the guests.

When dessert and coffee have been served, the guests will retire with the hostess to the drawing room.

If these instructions are observed everything will pass off very smoothly.

Salmon a la Reine / Laks a la Reine

A fish recipe found in “How To Eat Canned Salmon” published by Alaska Packers Association in 1900Salmon a la Reine / Laks a la Reine

Chafing-Dish_thumb2A chafing dish (from the French chauffer, “to make warm”) is a kind of portable grate raised on a tripod, originally heated with charcoal in a brazier, and used for foods that require gentle cooking, away from the “fierce” heat of direct flames. The chafing dish could be used at the table or provided with a cover for keeping food warm on a buffet. Double dishes that provide a protective water jacket are known as bains-marie and help keep delicate foods, such as fish, warm while preventing overcooking.

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Almond Health Bread / Helsebrød med Mandler

A recipe found in “Almond Recipes for the well balanced menu” published by Blue Diamond Almonds Brand in 1916
Almond-Health-Bread_thumb2

This bread may not be considered as very healty in our day and age with all that sugar and molasses, but it does at least sound very tasty

Ted
Winking smile

If you want to download this book in pdf format
you can do that
HERE

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The 1912 Titanic Lemon Tart / Titanic Sitronterte fra 1912

A historic tart recipe found on World Turn’d Upside Down
The 1912 Titanic Lemon Tart / Titanic Sitronterte fra 1912

Stephanie Ann Farra who runs ‘World Turn’d Upside Down‘ writes: The Challenge: “Foods served at notable events in history.

What kind of food was served at the coronation of Queen Elizabeth? What did Benjamin Franklin eat at the Constitutional Convention? Find a food item that was served at a notable event in history, research the recipe, and recreate the dish.”

Stephanie chose the lemon tart served the first class
passangers on Titatic

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Anne of Green Gable’s Nut Cake / Anne of Green Gables Nøttekake

A recipe inspired by the literature found on
World Turn’d Upside Down
Anne Of Green Gables Nut Cake_post

Stephanie Ann Farra who runs ‘World Turn’d Upside Down‘ writes: For this challenge, I decided to make the nut cake with pink icing and walnuts from Anne of Avonlea. It was a hard decision, I was considering making something from Les Miserables or Wuthering Heights as they were both books where food played a major role in the plot.  But I Love the Anne of Green Gables series and wanted to make this cake a few years back but hadn’t gotten around to it.

Anne Of Green Gables Nut Cake_ill

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Almond and Cherry Chocolate Creams / Mandel og Kirsebær Sjokolade Konfekt

A candy recipe found in “Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes” published by Baker’s Chocolate in 1909
Almond and Cherry Chocolate Creams / Mandel og Kirsebær Sjokolade Konfekt

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Plain Chocolate Caramels / Vanlige Sjokoladekarameller

A caramel recipe found in “Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes
by Miss Parloa” published by Baker’s Chocolate in 1909

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