Miniature Blue Cheese Quiches / Miniatyr Quicher med Gorgonzola

A spicy Quiche recipe found on teatimemagazine.com
Miniature Blue Cheese Quiches / Miniatyr Quicher med Gorgonzola

The sharp taste of gorgonzola cheese adds extra zip to these Miniature Blue Cheese Quiches.

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Potato Lefse / Potetlefse

A traditional Norvegian lefse recipe found on brodogkorn.no
Potato Lefse / Potetlefse

Potato Lefse is made from boiled potatoes, sour cream, cream, butter and flour, and baked on a griddle. Serve with your dinner, for lutefisk or other traditional Norwegian food like cured meat or bring it on a hike with nice toppings.

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Calzone al Prosciutto Cotto Affumicato – Calzone with Ham and Apples / Calzone med Skinke og Eple

A calzone from ”Pizza” a book in the “Kjøkkenbiblioteket”  (Kitchen Library) series published by Aventura Forlag in 1992.
Calzone al Prosciutto Cotto Affumicato

This recipe originates from the Alto Adige region in northern Italy. Feel free to substitute ham with other types of pork. But do not cut out horseradish, it brings out a lot of flavor from the meat and apples. One variation is to form the calzone with an open top.

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Nordic Dip / Nordisk Dipp

A flashback from the seventies found on “European Favourites” published by Collins in 1973
Nordic Dip / Nordisk Dipp

This may very well be a Nordic kind of dip from the early seventies. Paprika was high fashion among the cooking savoir faire back then and you risked getting celery in dishes where they far from belonged. Probably because some local health guru had sworn to its many benefits.

I can even remember a tv ad proclaiming celery’s magnificence as snacks. With this dip you could actually end up dipping pieces of celery in a dip containing celery. I’ve said it before, those were hard times back then.

To make it even worse, the horrid disco music  was lurking in the near future. A few years later you could actually risk sitting somewhere overdosing on celery listening to that horrible music. – Ted

Winking smile
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Earl Grey Chocolates / Earl Grey Sjokolader

A delicious chocolate recipe found on epicurus.comEarl Grey Chocolates_post

Tasty, sultry and sinfully good, Earl Grey Chocolates provide a delicious snack – a morsel of love. The tea ganache is smooth
and luscious.

This one is for you Ingrid ❤

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St Clement’s Pie / St Clements Pai

A classic British pierecipe foung on BBCgoodfood
St Clement’s Pie / St Clements Pai

A very British version of Key lime pie – an indulgent, creamy pai with tangy oranges and lemons.

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Apple Pandowdy / Eple Pandowdy

A 17th Century dessert recipe found on Revolutionary Pie
Apple Pandowdy / Eple Pandowdy

The girl who runs Revolutionary Pie writes: According to John Mariani in “The Dictionary of American Food and Drink”, pandowdy was first mentioned in print in 1805. The dessert turned up decades later in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “The Blithedale Romance” (1852):

“Hollingsworth [would] fill my plate from the great dish of
pan-dowdy.”

In the meantime, it was supposedly a favorite of Abigail and John Adams, although a recipe I saw attributed to Abigail has a pastry-dough crust, not a biscuit topping. Which is a true pandowdy? I don’t think anyone really knows for sure.

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Ham, Pineapple, and Cucumber Sandwiches / Skinke, Ananas, og Agurk Sandwicher

A delisious Afternoon Tea sandwich recipe found
on teatimemagazine.com

Ham, Pineapple, and Cucumber Sandwiches / Skinke, Ananas, og Agurk Sandwicher

These pretty Ham, Pineapple, and Cucumber Sandwiches,
garnished with thin slices of cucumber, will add a touch of elegance
to your tea table.

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Chicken in Port Wine / Kylling i Portvin

A chicken recipe from ”French Cooking” published by
Golden Appel in 1968

Chicken in Port Wine / Kylling i Portvin

I bought this book in a used book shop here in Oslo the other day. I didn’t check it very thoroughly, just made sure there was lots of colour phictures. When I got home and started to scan the book I realised that the recipes and the pictures were not on the same page at all. Irritating of course, it makes scanning a lot more time consuming.

Well, my mistake, but I’m a stubborn sod, so I scanned it anyway – Ted  😉

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Quenelles of Halibut with Saffron Sauce / Queneller av Kveite med Safransaus

A delicious and delicate French appetizer recipe found in
“Harrods Cookery Book” published in 1985

Quenelles of Halibut with Saffron Sauce / Queneller av Kveite med Safransaus

Quenelles are like poached mousseline dumplings and can be made from fish, shellfish, meat, poultry or game. The saffron sauce adds a delicate golden hue to this dish.

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Chantilly Potatoes / Chantilly Poteter

A quick and easy potato recipe found in “Woman’s Day Best Casseroles To¨Make” published in 1973
Chantilly Potatoes / Chantilly Poteter

A great way to use up leftovers and very versatile. Quick and easy comfort food. Serve the potatoes with a salad and meat leftovers for a great meal.

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Calumet Cream Puffs / Calumet Vannbakkels

A recipe from the “Calumet Cook Book” published in 1921
Calumet Cream Puffs / Calumet Vannbakkels

Back in my childhood cream puffs, particularly cream puff wreaths, were regarded as just about the most delicious kind of pastries one could be served. But as I’ve told you before, little Ted had a sweet tooth the size of a small South American country and as you will notice, the recipe contains no sugar. My old female relatives who were famous for their cream puffs were even stingy with the sugar in the whipped cream.

As our family were on our way to visit one of these old stingy bats little Ted was praying for anything but cream puffs. But what do you think happened.  Those old bats always had to show off with their damned cream puffs. The fifties were hard I tell you, just ask anyone who was there – Ted   😉

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Sherry Waffles / Sherryvafler

A filled cookie recipe found in “Det Nye Kjøkkenbiblioteket”
(The New Kitchen Library) published in 1971

Sherry Waffles / Sherryvafler

From the recipe text: It can not be repeated too often that you are fairly well covered for surprises in the form of suddenly arriving guests if you in the cookie jar have finished baked cookies that just need a quick whipped cream or the like to make you able to serve something really nice – such as some sherry waffles.

As you can see from the text above, Scandinavian housewive’s greatest fear back in the late sixties and early seventies was to be caught red handed by unannounced guests without some tempting goodies to serve with the coffee. Life was hard back then I can tell you, I was there – Ted 😉

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The Real Story About Irish Coffee And How It Was Invented

Before lattes and cappuccinos, before frappuccinos and espressos there was flavored coffee, ie Irish coffee, still one of the world’s most popular drinks. Yet not that much is known about why and how it became so popular.

irish coffee_01

Margaret O’Shaughnessy, the Founding Director at Foynes Flying Boat museum in County Limerick, has written to IrishCentral to say the flying boat terminal at Foynes, 35 miles from Shannon, and not Shannon Airport was the location for the first Irish Coffee after we mistakenly said Shannon was where it was invented in a recent article.

The inventor, bartender Joe Sheridan, later moved to San Francisco and worked at the Buena Vista Cafe irish coffee_04where journalist Stanton Delaplane of the San Francisco Chronicle had brought back the secret formula from Ireland and started one of the world’s most famous drinks.

Despite it being an incredible success, Delaplane later admitted he couldn’t stand the stuff yet found his name forever linked to it.

Sheridan was a top class chef and bartender whose family had moved from the North to Dublin. When he applied for the chef’s job at Rineanna, the townland in Limerick where the Flying Boat terminal was based, his application came in to CEO Brendan O’Regan for the position of chef and it simply stated, “Dear Sir. I’m the man for the job. Yours sincerely, Joe Sheridan.

It turned out he wasn’t lying. Foynes was the first Irish transatlantic Airport when Pan Am did their first passenger commercial flights from New York to Foynes in 1939 and Joe Sheridan soon became famous.

irish coffee_03The Pan Am flying boats were based at Foynes while Shannon Airport was actually 35 miles away. Charles Lindbergh helped choose the two airports for Pan Am but no direct flights from Shannon to the US occurred until 1945, long after Irish coffee was invented

Until then passengers to the US from Europe flew into Shannon and were bussed to Foynes.

In 1943 a flying boat flight to New York turned back due to bad weather and Joe Sheridan, originally from Castlederg in Co. Tyrone – a chef and highly skilled bartender – was asked to come back to Foynes to prepare hot food and drinks for the freezing passengers.

He put some good Irish whiskey into their coffees and was asked by the passengers if he had used Brazilian coffee to which he replied ”No it was Irish coffee.” He then continued to put the coffee in a glass and topped it with pouring cream – thus the Irish coffee we know today was invented in Foynes, not Shannon Airport that night.

Furthermore, in 1952 Joe Sheridan was offered a job in san Francisco at the Buena Vista and he met Stanton Delaplane the journalist who had made his drink world famous.

irish coffee_05

The San Francisco Chronicle reported that after sampling Irish Coffee at Foynes in 1951 Delaplane flew home and he spent a long evening at the Buena Vista Cafe near the foot of Hyde Street working out the proper balance of ingredients. Overnight Jack Koeppler, the late owner of what had been a quiet neighborhood bar, found himself the proprietor of the most prosperous saloon in the city.

irish coffee_06Five years later, Delaplane was quoted in Time magazine as saying; “I can’t stand the stuff anymore.”

Joe Sheridan was even enticed over to the Buena Vista in 1952 and worked there for ten years. He is buried in Oakland, CA. Delaplane, who was the winner of a Pulitzer Prize, died in 1988.

Today the Buena Vista serves up to 2,000 Irish coffees a day. The busiest day they’ve ever had was the Super Bowl in 1982, 49ers vs. Miami. Three bartenders served 109 bottles of whiskey between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. The night crew served another 104. There are 29 drinks per bottle. So that means the pub served well over 6,000 drinks that day [6,177 specifically].

All because of a cold night and bad weather, all because of a storm in 1943 that forced a flight to America back to its origin at Foynes Irish coffee became the first flavored coffee drink. One wonders what Joe and Stan would make of all the flavored beans in Starbuck’s these days!

traditional strong irish coffee on wooden bar with coffee beans

Article by James O’Shea found at irishcentral.com

Ryzon Strawberry Shortcake / Ryzon Jordbærkake

A cake recipe found in a booklet published by Ryzon in 1932
Ryzon Strawberry Shortcake / Ryzon Jordbærkake

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