Hungarian Dobos Torte / Ungarsk Dobos Torte

A classic Continental 19th century cake recipe found in
“The Chocolate Book” by Valerie Barrett published in 1987

Hungarian Dobos Torte / Ungarsk Dobos Torte

Dobos torte or Dobosh (pronounced [ˈdoboʃ], Hungarian: Dobos torta) is a Hungarian sponge cake layered with chocolate buttercream and topped with caramel. The five-layer pastry is named after its inventor, Hungarian confectioner József C. Dobos, who aimed to create a cake that would last longer than other pastries in an age when cooling techniques were limited. The round sides of the cake are coated with ground hazelnuts, chestnuts, walnuts, or almonds, and the caramel topping helps to prevent drying out.

Dobosh or Dobos torte was first introduced at the National General Exhibition of Budapest in 1885; King Franz Joseph I and Queen Elisabeth were among the first to taste it. The cake soon became popular throughout Europe, both for its durability through shipping and for its unique appearance. With its flat, shiny, caramel top, it was simple but elegant, as opposed to the more intricate cakes of the age.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Norwegian Sunshine Buns / Solskinnsboller

A bun recipe found in “Den Store Bakeboken”
(The Big Baking Book) published by Schibstedt in 1978
Norwegian Sunshine Buns / Solskinnsboller

In Northern Norway, these are usually called just “Solboller”
(Sun Buns) and they are eaten  at the end of the dark winter
to celebrate that the sun has returned.

You might have seen other recipes for Norwegian
Sunshine Buns, there is a multitude of them
out there. I’ve even posted at least one earlier – Ted

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge norwegian_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Coffee Nut Cupcakes / Cupcakes med Kaffe og Nøtter

A baking recipe from “The Story of Coffee and How To Make It” published by The Cheek-Neal Coffee Co in 1925
Coffee Nut Cupcakes / Cupcakes med Kaffe og Nøtter

Yet another of those eats for adults from the book that tells you the story of coffee and gives you recipes for coffee tasting goodies.

000_england_recipe_marker_nysmall icon000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

The History of Pies

The need for nutritious, easy-to-store, easy-to-carry, and long-lasting foods on long journeys, in particular at sea, was initially solved by taking live food along with a butcher or cook. However, this took up additional space on what were either horse-powered treks or small ships, reducing the time of travel before additional food was required. This resulted in early armies adopting the style of hunter-foraging.

The introduction of the baking of processed cereals including the creation of flour, provided a more reliable source of food. Egyptian sailors carried a flat brittle bread loaf of millet bread called dhourra cake, while the Romans had a biscuit called buccellum.

The History of PiesDuring the Egyptian Neolithic period or New Stone Age period, the use of stone tools shaped by polishing or grinding, the domestication of plants and animals, the establishment of permanent villages, and the practice of crafts such as pottery and weaving became common. Early pies were in the form of flat, round or freeform crusty cakes called galettes consisting of a crust of ground oats, wheat, rye, or barley containing honey inside. These galettes developed into a form of early sweet pastry or desserts, evidence of which can be found on the tomb walls of the Pharaoh Ramesses II, who ruled from 1304 to 1237 BC, located in the Valley of the Kings. Sometime before 2000 BC, a recipe for chicken pie was written on a tablet in Sumer.

The History of PiesAncient Greeks are believed to have originated pie pastry. In the plays of Aristophanes (5th century BC), there are mentions of sweetmeats including small pastries filled with fruit. Nothing is known of the actual pastry used, but the Greeks certainly recognized the trade of pastry-cook as distinct from that of baker. (When fat is added to a flour-water paste it becomes a pastry.) The Romans made a plain pastry of flour, oil, and water to cover meats and fowls which were baked, thus keeping in the juices. (The covering was not meant to be eaten; it filled the role of what was later called puff paste.) A richer pastry, intended to be eaten, was used to make small pasties containing eggs or little birds which were among the minor items served at banquets.

The History of PiesThe 1st-century Roman cookbook Apicius makes various mentions of recipes which involve a pie case. By 160 BC, Roman statesman Marcus Porcius Cato (234–149 BC), who wrote De Agri Cultura, notes the recipe for the most popular pie/cake called placenta. Also called libum by the Romans, it was more like a modern-day cheesecake on a pastry base, often used as an offering to the gods. With the development of the Roman Empire and its efficient road transport, pie cooking spread throughout Europe.

Pies remained as a staple of traveling and working peoples in the colder northern European countries, with regional variations based on both the locally grown and available meats, as well as the locally farmed cereal crop. The Cornish pasty is an adaptation of the pie to a working man’s daily food needs.

Medieval cooks had restricted access to ovens due to their costs of construction and need for abundant supplies of fuel. Pies could be easily cooked over an open fire, while partnering with a baker allowed them to cook the filling inside their own locally defined casing. The earliest pie-like recipes refer to coffyns (the word actually used for a basket or box), with straight sealed sides and a top; open-top pies were referred to as traps. The resulting hardened pastry was not necessarily eaten, its function being to contain the filling for cooking, and to store it, though whether servants may have eaten it once their masters had eaten the filling is impossible to prove. This may also be the reason why early recipes focus on the filling over the surrounding case, with the partnership development leading to the use of reusable earthenware pie cases which reduced the use of expensive flour.

The History of Pies

The first reference to “pyes” as food items appeared in England (in a Latin context) as early as the 12th century, but no unequivocal reference to the item with which the article is concerned is attested until the 14th century (Oxford English Dictionary sb pie).

The History of PiesSong birds at the time were a delicacy and protected by Royal Law. At the coronation of eight-year-old English King Henry VI (1422–1461) in 1429, “Partryche and Pecock enhackyll” pie was served, consisting of cooked peacock mounted in its skin on a peacock-filled pie. Cooked birds were frequently placed by European royal cooks on top of a large pie to identify its contents, leading to its later adaptation in pre-Victorian times as a porcelain ornament to release of steam and identify a good pie.

The Pilgrim fathers and early settlers brought their pie recipes with them to America, adapting to the ingredients and techniques available to them in the New World. Their first pies were based on berries and fruits pointed out to them by the Native North Americans. Pies allowed colonial cooks to stretch ingredients and also used round shallow pans to literally “cut corners” and to create a regional variation of shallow pie.

Text from Wikipedia

Lemon and Poppy Seed Drop Scones / Drop Scones med Sitron og Valmuefrø

A Scotish griddle baking recipe found at mytaste.co.ukLemon and Poppy Seed Drop Scones / Drop Scones med Sitron og Valmuefrø

Drop scones, also called Scotch pancakes, are easy and fun to make, and perfect for tea or even as a simple dessert. Served with lemon curd and runny honey, they are quite irresistible.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge scottish_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Orange Glory / Appelsin Herligheter

An orange flavoured dessert recipe found in
“150 New Ways to Serve Ice Cream”
published by  Sealtest System Laboratories Inc in 1936

Orange Glory / Appelsin Herligheter

The old fashioned “dowdy” that our grandmothers used to serve was a simple bread and fruit pudding. Many of us still have tantalizing memories of it. This 1930s version comes to us in a new guise.

000_england_recipe_marker_ny[10]traditional badge dessert_flat_thumb[1]000_norway_recipe_marker_ny[6]

Banana Walnut Cake / Banan- og Valnøttkake

A baking recipe found in “To Win New Cooking Fame –
Just Add Waluts” published by Diamond Brand Walnuts in 1937

Banana Walnut Cake / Banan- og Valnøttkake

Bananas and walnuts is a wicked combo as Jamie Oliver would
have said had he lived back then. And he would have been right
of course – Ted

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge baking_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Scones with Vanilla and Maple Syrup Butter / Scones med Vanilje- og Lønnesirupsmør

A tasty scones recipe found on oetker.no
Scones with Vanilla and Maple Syrup Butter / Scones med Vanilje- og Lønnesirupsmør

These scones are plain, meaning without added fruit, but they are light, airy and have just the right amount of crusty surface that makes them the perfect backdrop for the vanilla and maple syrup butter.

000_england_recipe_marker_ny000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Butter Buns with Vanilla Cream and Berries / Smørboller med Vaniljekrem og Bær

A classic Norwegian bun recipe found on tine.no
Butter Buns with Vanilla Cream and Berries / Smørboller med Vaniljekrem og Bær

Nothing tastes better than fresh yeast bakery. It does not have to be a special occasion, these buns can be enjoyed fresh any day or you can freeze them and serve them should you get unexpected guests. You get about 20 buns from this recipe.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge norwegian_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Almond Eyes / Mandeløyne

A cookie recipe from “Kaker til Kaffekosen” (Cakes for a
Cosy Cup of Coffee ) i serien “Ingrids Beste” (Ingrid’s Best) published by Gyldendal in 1991

Almond Eyes / Mandeløyne

This dough is very easy to work with, so baking these cakes does not take as long as you may think.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge norwegian_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Lunch Rolls with Cheese / Lunch Rundstykker med Ost

A baking recipe found in “Den Store Bakeboken”
(The Big Baking Book) published by Schibstedt i 1978

Lunch Rolls with Cheese / Lunch Rundstykker med Ost

Norwegians seldom eat hot lunches, so fresh bread or rolls is important stuff here round that time of the day whether we’ve packed our lunch before leaving home or buy sandwhiches at a bakers or in the cafeteria at work. Special bread or rolls like these are popular here both home baked and bought.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge baking_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

French Apple Pie / Fransk Eplepai

A classic French baking recipe found in”French Cooking”
published by Golden Apple in 1986

French Apple Pie / Fransk Eplepai

If you’re looking to try to get your hands dirty with some
classic French baking, why not start with this pie.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge french_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Double Oat Muffins / Muffins med Dobbel Havre

A wholesome muffins recipe found in “Quaker Oats Brand Cookbook” published by The Quaker Oats Company in 1989
Double Oat Muffins / Muffins med Dobbel Havre

The combination of oats and oat bran create a healthful grain muffin  perfect for breakfast or as a snack. Prepare in the microwave for fresh, hot muffins anytime.

000_england_recipe_marker_nylite icon000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Peanut Butter Cookies / Peanøttsmørkaker

A cookie recipe found in “Cooky Jar Favourites”
published by the Tested Recipe Institute in 1960

Peanut Butter Cookies / Peanøttsmørkaker

Peanut butter, raisins and oats should give these cookies the perfect
chewiness. Just the thing with a glass of lemonade for the children of the Norwegian post-war baby boom which I was a part back in 1960
when this book was published. Little Ted was 7 back then.

Winking smile

000_england_recipe_marker_nyill_105000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Mint Frosted Brownies / Brownies med Peppermynteglasur

A brownie recipe found in “Hershey’s Make It Chocolate!”
published by Hershey in 1987

Mint Frosted Brownies / Brownies med Peppermynteglasur

Mint is I guess something one either love or hate. I have friends who can’t stand it, but for my part I love it in any form. Nothing beat a good book and a steaming cup of mint tea in the evening particulary when combined with a few thin After Eight mint wafers. A couple of these brownies would do nicely too – Ted

000_england_recipe_marker_nyteacup2000_norway_recipe_marker_ny