One Pot Creamy Chicken and Rice / Kremaktig Kylling og Ris Tilberedt i en Gryte

A camp fire one pot dinner recipe found on I heart Naptime
One Pot Creamy Chicken and Rice / Kremaktig Kylling og Ris Tilberedt i en Gryte

Easy healthy dinner recipe made with simple real
ingredients in just one pot.

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Thickened Chicken Soup / Jevnet Hønsesuppe

A quick soup recipe found in “Mat for Travle” (Food for
Busy People) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1982

Thickened Chicken Soup / Jevnet Hønsesuppe

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Chicken Suprême / Kylling Suprême

An exciting chicken recipe found in “Fjærfe på Menyen”
(Poultry on the Menu) published by
Den Norske Bokklubben i 1984

Chicken Suprême / Kylling Suprême

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Sweet and Spicy Chicken Skewers / Søte og Krydret Kyllingspyd

A juicy campfire skewer recipe found at tammileetips.com
Sweet and Spicy Chicken Skewers / Søte og Krydret Kyllingspyd

Grilled sweet and spicy chicken skewers that is so easy to make! Great for the campfire or camp grill! Pineapple, peppers, and chicken grilled together to make a perfect meal.

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Chicken Stroganoff /Kylling Stroganoff

A stroganoff variation with chicken found in
“A Sampler of Modern Sour Cream Recipes”
published by the American Dairy Association in 1970

Chicken Stroganoff /Kylling Stroganoff

Beef Stroganoff (Russian: бефстроганов befstróganov) is a Russian dish of sautéed pieces of beef or served in a sauce with smetana (sour cream). From its origins in mid-19th-century Russia, it has become popular around the world, with considerable variation from the original recipe such as this one.

Various explanations are given for the name, presumably derived from some member of the large and important Stroganov family, perhaps Alexander Grigorievich Stroganoff of Odessa or a diplomat, Count Pavel Stroganov.

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Chicken with Almond Rice / Kylling med Mandelris

A dinner recipe found in “The Treasury of The
Worlds Best Almond Recipes” published by
Blue Diamond Almonds Brand in 1963

Chicken with Almond Rice / Kylling med Mandelris

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Stir-fried Chicken with Ginger and Snow Peas / Wokket kylling med Ingefær og Sukkererter

A Chinese recipe found in “Harrods Cookery Book”
published in 1985

Stir-fried Chicken with Ginger and Snow Peas / Wokket kylling med Ingefær og Sukkererter

The secret of success when stir-frying is organization. Having all the ingredients prepared and close at hand is essential, as the actual cooking time is surprisingly quick. Snow peas add color and a crunchy texture to this delicious Chinese dish.

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Tomato, Chicken and Mushroom Soup / Tomat-, Kylling- og Soppsuppe

A recipe for a thick, tasty chicken soup found in
“Fast Fabelous Meals” published by Minute Rice679_tomato-chicken-and-mushroom-soup[1]

Instant rice, also known as minute rice, is rice that has been precooked. Some types are microwave ready. Some types are dehydrated so that it cooks more rapidly. Regular rice requires 18-30 minutes to cook while instant rice needs anywhere between 1-7 minutes. Because it has already been cooked, all that is necessary to prepare instant rice is to simply re-hydrate it with hot water.

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Chicken & Mushroom Stir Fry / Wokket Kylling og Sopp

A Chinese inspired stir fry dish found on oxo.co.uk
Chicken & Mushroom Stir Fry / Wokket Kylling og Sopp

Stir frying (Chinese: 炒; pinyin: chǎo) is a Chinese cooking technique in which ingredients are fried in a small amount of very hot oil while being stirred in a wok. The technique originated in China and in recent centuries has spread into other parts of Asia and the West. Many claim that this quick, hot cooking seals in the flavors of the foods, as well as preserving their color and texture.

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Indian Chicken Crepes / Indisk Kyllingfylte Pannekaker

An Indian recipe found in “Quaker Oats Brand Cookbook”
published by The Quaker Oats Company in 1989Indian Chicken Crepes / Indisk Kyllingfylte Pannekaker


Curry, peanuts and raisins are popular flavors of Indian cooking
and make a sensational filling for these healthful oat bran crepes.

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More Than Chicken Soup: Food Remedies

An article by Stephanie Butler posted in
Hungry History at history.com June 2015

It’s likely you’ve heard the adage “An apple a day keeps the doctor away,” and everyone knows about the reputed healing powers of a More Than Chicken Soup: Food Remediessteaming bowl of chicken soup. But would you think to place potato slices on a fever-stricken patient’s forehead? Or shampoo with mayonnaise to give your mane that healthy shine? Foods have been used as medicine since our Neolithic ancestors ate mosses with antibiotic properties to help heal wounds. It’s a long road from healing mosses to zinc lozenges, so let’s take a look at the world of food remedies.

More Than Chicken Soup: Food RemediesSeveral hundred years before Alexander Fleming discovered the benefits of penicillin, European housewives kept moldy loaves of bread hidden in their kitchen cabinets. When a family member got a cut or scrape, they would break off bits of the moldy bread, mix it with water to form a paste and paint it over wounds. This method was hardly a cure-all, since it depended on the natural presence of penicillium or other antiseptic molds to be beneficial. But when it did work, the bread treatment must have seemed like a godsend in a world lacking even a basic understanding of how diseases spread.

These medical dark ages lasted far too long for many patients. From the medieval era all the way up through World War I, wartime was especially harrowing for patients and doctors. During the Civil War, for More Than Chicken Soup: Food Remediesinstance, more men died from disease than on the battlefield. People resorted to food- and plant-based remedies because demand for more scientific medicines far outstripped supply. For example, both Northern and Southern troops placed poultices of cooked onions and garlic on their chests to combat croup and congestion. In 1863, Alabama’s Mobile Register gave a delicious-sounding recipe for blackberry cordial that promised to “alleviate the suffering and perhaps save the lives of many of our soldiers” who were sickened by drinking typhus-contaminated water. Baking soda was administered to treat upset stomachs, and sprained limbs were often soaked in salt solutions, a practice that continues today. For amputations, unlucky soldiers were often given wooden spoons—not to cook with, of course, but to clench in their teeth.

More Than Chicken Soup: Food Remedies

At the same time, an ocean away, England was experiencing a true golden age of food remedies. Modern medical breakthroughs like pasteurization (in 1862) and the stethoscope (in 1852) were finally More Than Chicken Soup: Food Remediesbeginning to catch up with kitchen cures, creating a uniquely British blend of folk wisdom and scientific method—the apothecary shop. Modern treatments like morphine, laudanum and chloroform found places on apothecary shelves right next to rosemary tinctures and essence of sage. Receipt books from the period show a real appreciation for the healing powers of lard, which could soothe chapped hands, ease inflammations and help repair burns. Herbs were used liberally in the Victorian home: Dill water could calm a colicky baby, lovage and peppermint were brewed into teas to cure upset stomachs and rosemary-infused alcohol was used for pain. Looking through Victorian medical books, we can see many treatments still familiar to us today. Add two handfuls of oats into a warm bath, for instance, and eczema and chickenpox sufferers would itch no more.

More Than Chicken Soup: Food RemediesBut what about the proverbial apples and chicken soup? Do they really work as well as folk wisdom seems to dictate? While an apple a day certainly won’t guarantee perfect health, apple extract has been shown to decrease cancer cell growth dramatically. Just don’t forget to eat the peel—that’s where most of the beneficial nutrients are found. And a 2000 study demonstrated that chicken soup does indeed have anti-inflammatory properties that help reduce cold symptoms. As for lard salve and onion poultices, however, the jury’s still out.

Chicken Salad / Kyllingsalat

A lunch salad recipe found in “Cattelins Kokebok”
(Cattelin’s Cook Book) published in 1978

Chicken Salad / Kyllingsalat

Cattelin was one of the best and cheapest restaurants in Stockholm. It had survived wars, disasters and changing tastes, and still managed to pack ‘em in until they were forced to shut down in 2011, so they must have done a lot of things right.

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Thai Chicken and Cashew Yellow Curry / Gul Thaikarri med Kylling og Cashewnøtter

A spicy dinner recipe found in “Healthy Recipes with Dairy Food” a free E-book published by Dairy Australia
Thai Chicken and Cashew Yellow Curry / Gul Thaikarri med Kylling og Cashewnøtter

Thai cuisine (Thai: อาหารไทย, rtgs: Ahan Thai, pronounced [ʔāː.hǎːn tʰāj]) is the national cuisine of Thailand. Balance, detail, and variety are of paramount significance to Thai chefs.

Thai cooking places emphasis on lightly prepared dishes with strong aromatic components and a spicy edge. It is known for its complex interplay of at least three and up to four or five fundamental taste senses in each dish or the overall meal: sour, sweet, salty, bitter, and spicy. Thai chef McDang characterises Thai food as demonstrating “intricacy; attention to detail; texture; color; taste; and the use of ingredients with medicinal benefits, as well as good flavor”, as well as care being given to the food’s appearance, smell and context. Australian chef David Thompson, an expert on Thai food, observes that unlike many other cuisines, Thai cooking rejects simplicity and is about “the juggling of disparate elements to create a harmonious finish”.

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Ginger Chicken /Ingefærkylling

A spicy chicken recipe found in “Fjærfe” (Poultry)
published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1982ingefærkylling_post_thumb[2]_thumb

Edible rootsThe history of Ginger goes back over 5000 years when the Indians and ancient Chinese considered it a tonic root for all ailments. While Ginger originated in Southeast Asia, it has a long history of being cultivated in other countries. At an early date it was exported to Ancient Rome from India. It was used extensively by the Romans, but almost disappeared from the pantry when the Roman Empire fell. After the end of the Roman Empire, the Arabs took control of the spice trade from the east. Ginger became quite costly like many other spices. In medieval times it was commonly imported in a preserved form and used to make sweets.

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A short History of Chicken as Food

A short History of Chicken as FoodChicken is the most common type of poultry in the world. In developed countries, chickens are usually subject to intensive farming methods.

History

The modern chicken is a descendant of red junglefowl hybrids along with the grey junglefowl first raised thousands of years ago in the northern parts of the Indian subcontinent.

Red Junglefowl
Red Junglefowl

Grey Junglefowl
Grey Junglefowl

A short History of Chicken as FoodChicken as a meat has been depicted in Babylonian carvings from around 600 BC. Chicken was one of the most common meats available in the Middle Ages. It was eaten over most of the Eastern hemisphere and a number of different kinds of chicken such as capons, pullets and hens were eaten. It was one of the basic ingredients in blancmange, a stew usually consisting of chicken and fried onions cooked in milk and seasoned with spices and sugar.

A short History of Chicken as FoodIn the United States in the 1800s, chicken was more expensive than other meats and it was “sought by the rich because [it is] so costly as to be an uncommon dish.” Chicken consumption in the United States increased during World War II due to a shortage of beef and pork. In Europe, consumption of chicken overtook that of beef and veal in 1996, linked to consumer awareness of Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mad cow disease).

Breeding

A short History of Chicken as FoodModern varieties of chicken such as the Cornish Cross, are bred specifically for meat production, with an emphasis placed on the ratio of feed to meat produced by the animal. The most common breeds of chicken consumed in the US are Cornish and White Rock.

Chickens raised specifically for food are called broilers. In the United States, broilers are typically butchered at a young age. Modern Cornish Cross hybrids, for example, are butchered as early as 8 weeks for fryers and 12 weeks for roasting birds.

A short History of Chicken as Food

Capons (castrated cocks) produce more and fattier meat. For this reason, they are considered a delicacy and were particularly popular in the Middle Ages.

Text from Wikipedia