Tomato-Mushroom Chicken Pot Pie / Tomat, Sopp og Kyllingpai

A classic comfort food recipe found on
betterhomesandgardens.com

Tomato-Mushroom Chicken Pot Pie / Tomat, Sopp og Kyllingpai

Pot pie is the ultimate comfort food. With switched-up ingredients and a creative twist, you  elevate this classic from familiar to fabulous.

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French Apple Pie / Fransk Eplepai

A classic French baking recipe found in”French Cooking”
published by Golden Apple in 1986

French Apple Pie / Fransk Eplepai

If you’re looking to try to get your hands dirty with some
classic French baking, why not start with this pie.

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Marlborough Pie / Marlborough Pai

A 17th century pie recipe found on historyextra.com
Marlborough Pie / Marlborough Pai

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, Sam recreates marlborough pie – a tasty pie that travelled to America in the 17th century.

Sam writes: English chef Robert May created this apple custard pie when compiling dishes for his 1660 recipe book The Accomplisht Cook.

As the English established colonies in the New World during the 17th century, settlers took the pie recipe with them. Since the 19th century it has become a favourite dessert in the US during holidays such as Thanksgiving.

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Tourtière de Crème Grand Mernier

A grand cake recipe found in “The Grand Grand Marnier Cookbook” by James Beard published in 1970
Tourtière de Crème Grand Mernier

“I’m sure that most of us have enjoyed Grand Marnier after many a fine meal. But it’s a shame that we don’t enjoy it so often in our meals. I find Grand Mamier excellent for adding a little extra ‘grandeur’. I hope that you will enjoy my Grand Recipes as much as I enjoyed creating them” – James Beard

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Steak and Oyster Pie / Biff- og Østerspai

A classic pie recipe found in “Harrods Cookery Book”
published in 1985

Steak and Oyster Pie / Biff- og Østerspai

During the last century oysters were cheap and plentiful and were often used in pies to pad out the more expensive ingredients. Canned oysters may be used if fresh are unavailable.

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WWII Homity Pie / WWII Homity Pai

A pie recipe from The Second World War  found on historyextra.com
WWII Homity Pie / WWII Homity Pai

No one knows where the name for Homity Pie originates from but the dish was popular with land girls during the Second World War. As well as unrationed items, the recipe also includes rationed foods like cheese, eggs and butter – the original recipe would have used these frugally. Nowadays we don’t have to be so sparing with the cheese and butter, which only make it even tastier.

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, Sam recreates homity pie – a hearty, vegetarian dish popular during the Second World War.

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In Contex

The Land Girls

The Women’s Land Army (WLA) was a British civilian organisation created during the First and Second World Wars so women could work in agriculture, replacing men called up to the military. Women who worked for the WLA were commonly known as Land Girls. The name Women’s Land Army was also used in the United States for an organisation formally called the Woman’s Land Army of America.

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In effect the Land Army operated to place women with farms that needed workers, the farmers being their employers.

Second World War

As the prospect of war became increasingly likely, the government wanted to increase the amount of food grown within Britain. In order to grow more food, more help was needed on the farms and so the government started the Women’s Land Army in June 1939.

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The majority of the Land Girls already lived in the countryside but more than a third came from London and the industrial cities of the north of England.

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In the Second World War, though under the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, it was given an honorary head – Lady Gertrude Denman. At first it asked for volunteers. This was supplemented by conscription, so that by 1944 it had over 80,000 members. The WLA lasted until its official disbandment on 21 October 1949.

Land girls were also formed to supply New Zealand’s agriculture during the war. City girls from the age of 17 and up were sent to assist on sheep, cattle, dairy, orchard and poultry properties.

In popular culture

The Women’s Land Army was the subject of:

St Clement’s Pie / St Clements Pai

A classic British pierecipe foung on BBCgoodfood
St Clement’s Pie / St Clements Pai

A very British version of Key lime pie – an indulgent, creamy pai with tangy oranges and lemons.

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Poacher’s Pie / Tjuvjeger Pai

En classic British pie recipe found on cookit.e2bn.org
Poacher’s Pie / Tjuvjeger Pai

This recipe goes back a long time but was still popular amomg middel class Brits in the thirties as their dinner habits still was rather conservative back then.

By the 1950’s, poacher’s pie had become a working class dish and used cheaper ingredients, such as just sausage meat, and was cooked with only a top made of mashed potatoes.

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Mash-Topped Beef & Guinness Pie / Oksekjøtt og Guinness Pai med Potetmoslokk

A great winter dinner recipe found on jamieoliver.comMash-Topped Beef & Guinness Pie / Oksekjøtt og Guinness Pai med Potetmoslokk

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Dill and Shrimp Pie / Dill- och Räkpaj

A felicious lunch recipe found on recept.nuDill- och räkpaj_recept_se_post

With all this dill, this dish could not be anything but Swedish – Ted  😉

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